Happy New Year

And so passes another decade and entrance into a New Year: 2020. Seasons come and go; the years pass by; and the days linger beyond the daily grind of an impervious universe. We mark the occasion with celebratory bifurcations: Before the second and just after; and yet, nothing much changes, only that we have to remember to change every notation from “19” to “20”. Objectively, does it make any sense? Or does the continuum of time merely reflect the truth that such artificial demarcations are only for convenience’s sake, in order to have an excuse to act in ways we otherwise would be too embarrassed to admit to? Nevertheless, whether artificial or natural, the change of another year is a time to celebrate, and to reflect upon a coming New Year full of hope for the future and putting behind us the trials of yesteryear.

Enjoy the moment, for the worth it represents: It is indeed a New Year, fresh in its resolve and without any mistakes in the first few seconds. Happy New Year!

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Federal Disability Retirement: The Hunt for Nirvana

The initial question is: Is there even such a state?  That would, of course, preemptively undermine the very “hunt” for it, precisely because it would be an act of futility.  On the other hand, don’t most of us chase after chimeras of various sorts — whether of fame, wealth, lost loves or repressed daydreams?  So, why not hunt after the paradigm of paragon-like virtues — a state of release, of a transcendent experience devoid of self, suffering and selfish self-centeredness; or, as some might say, of a death-like state in living form.  Many would not even have a desire for such a state.

The amalgamation of we “think” is the state of Nirvana is probably quite different from the actual concept as attained or sought after by those who profess a belief in it.  It is the complete loss of self; of a state where one’s ego no longer exists, and with its disappearance, both sides of the human “coin” are also transcended: pleasure and pain.  One cannot go through life without its opposite and corollary: If you are capable of experiencing pleasure, then you are open to feeling pain, just as the person who can have happiness must by necessity tolerate sadness.  It is, unfortunately, part of being what it means to be “human”, and it is an act of futility if you try and expunge one while attempting to retain the other.  It is simply not possible.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, it is likely time to consult with a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law.  Preparing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS is not a hunt for Nirvana; no, not even close.  In fact, it is another bureaucratic morass which can be a pain in the proverbial behind, and is a long and complex administrative process which makes the hunt for Nirvana like a pleasurable vacation in comparison.

Consult with an experienced attorney who specializes and knows about Federal Disability Retirement Law, and leave the hunt for Nirvana to those who like to trek through the Himalayan mountains.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire