Postal & Federal Disability Retirement: Music in One’s Step

You can almost hear it in certain people, when they walk by or pass afar; while in others, it is a distant echo that barely resounds.  Is it a jazz tune, or a popular song that recently hit the charts?

The music in one’s step is in the charm of ambulation; the skip that forsakes a groan and a stutter that takes the imaginary partner in a twirl of an exuberant burst.  The outer world cannot hear, as if the silence is drowned out by the drone of futility; but one can nevertheless hear the music in one’s step, if only by a pantomime of imagined orchestras.

When did we lose it?  How did we forget to turn it back on?  Was it the medical condition that extinguished the last twang of the guitar such that we forgot the joy of living?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the loan of music in one’s step is is often the clear indication that nudges the Federal or Postal employee into realizing the necessity of filing for Federal OPM Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Consult with a Federal Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and consider regaining the music in one’s step, now gone but there to be re-tuned.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement: The Emperor Who Wore No Clothes

We all know the story; of human foibles and self-aggrandizement.  Of the Emperor who thought himself so important that he — with the help of all of the sycophants he had surrounded himself with — believed that self-delusion could carry him naked through the streets of his empire.  That is, until a child pointed to the Emperor with no clothes, and innocently declared, “Look — he’s not wearing any clothes!”

It is a metaphor for how many of us live; of going about knowing what we want to avoid, and where everyone else similarly knows it, too, but doesn’t want to declare it out in the open.  Why is it that we can lie to ourselves so easily, and how is it that others will cooperate so readily?

The world of illusions we create, however, are like houses of cards that can easily collapse and crack under the pressure of reality’s curse of imponderable harshness; we can only survive a lie for so long, before the burden of truth undermines the fragile solemnity of an impervious universe.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition no longer allows you to work in your Federal or Postal job, consult with an OPM Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, lest you continue to work well beyond the point where the emperor’s clothes have been taken off, and it is only you who believes what everyone else already knows — that it is time to throw in the proverbial towel and reveal the naked truth beneath.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement: The Grief of Life

“Good Grief, Charlies Brown!”  It is an expression of exasperation, often emitted from Lucy’s mouth during the long run of the Peanuts’ comic strip.  The phrase itself is undefined, and yet most of us comprehend its import: That life itself is a series of grief-filled moments; of mistakes and failures; of acts which people engage in that belie understanding; that the puzzlement and conundrum of events that hit us, emotions that arise and how people behave result in grief untold.

It is well that a child is often protected from the grief of adulthood, lest the child be damaged even before he or she enters the harsh reality of the greater world.  Yet, like raindrops that fall from the sky and, on its spiraling journey downwards, accumulates all of the dirt and grime of the world, so the grief of life begins to take it toll upon us all as we interact and encounter the sheer meanness of the world.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the grief of life takes two forms: First, the medical condition itself and the impact upon one’s career and positional duties, and Second, from the uncaring attitude from the Agency, the Postal Service, and coworkers who make up the aggregation of the “agency” itself.  Such a “double whammy” is often the impetus to contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law.

Consult with an OPM Disability Attorney who focuses purely upon getting people Federal Disability Retirement benefits in order to limit the impact of engaging in the bureaucratic complexities of preparing, formulating and filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits; otherwise, like Charlie Brown and others in the Peanuts gang, you may end up shouting in exasperation, “Good Grief!”

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Government Employee Disability Retirement: Trials

There are many of them; and whether used in the general sense of “trials in life”, or in the more technical sense of the dramas taking place all across the courtrooms of every country and nation, the meaning behind the term amounts to the same: the challenge of overcoming adversity; the encounter with and resolution of conflict; the intimidation of people and events; the facing of an unpleasant reality.

Life can never to lived without it; for, the very definition of a human life can be summed up in a single word: Trials.

Life is a series of them; and whether you characterize each as a “problem” or as a “challenge”, it is the difference between having a pessimistic outlook upon the world, or of the more bright-eyed view of the optimist.  Trials are what either form the character, or destroy the individual in the process.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job and career, consult with an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, lest the trials of life’s misgivings defeat the very purpose of the trial itself: To win, to overcome, to defeat the opposition; and then to move on in life.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Employee Disability Retirement: Human Failure

It is the stuff of tragedies and pablum for tearful stories.  Human failure, as distinct from errors committed by other species, is unique for its moral implications and impact upon lives left behind.  Other species may have their failures — a squirrel that misjudges a branch and falls to the ground; a predatory search that ends without a meal; an incursion into human territory where traps await or a hunter sights. The consequences of such failure may result in the death or injury to the animal involved.

Human failure, however, often results in lives being destroyed for years beyond, where not only physical injury becomes evident, but the lasting damage to a psyche yet untold.  We try and restrict it; some manage to get through life without much scathing or scarring; but most of us have a trail of failures like a dust storm that leaves an eternal residue of soot and sorrow.  It is, also, often in how one views failures or successes.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing all of the essential elements of one’s job, human failure is often misinterpreted.

It is not our “fault” that you have become injured or beset with a medical condition, and Federal Disability Retirement recognizes that your humanity still holds some future potential — which is the reason why, even after being approved for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, you are allowed to work in another job and make up to 80% of what your former Federal position currently pays, and still continue to receive your Federal Disability Retirement annuity.

Consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin to focus back upon your human potential, and leave behind the trail of human failure.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement: Happiness Only in Stories

Perhaps it is an unavoidable truism that such states of unmitigated joy can be found only in stories; of triumph over tragedy; of endings worthy of fairytales; and of innocence still untouched.  Life is a series of crisis, marked by momentary fragments of a respite well-deserved.

It is the story of human history, whether of private lives left untold within the tombs of unmarked graves or of biographies never written, and which became silent upon the demise of the family stories that were uttered only at gatherings and with the rhythmic rocking of chairs where porch lights were left on with the humming of mosquitoes and moths fluttering against the midnight air.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition and who need to file for FERS Disability Retirement benefits, the story which must be told is the response to the questions on OPM SF 3112A, Applicant’s Statement of Disability.  It is not one of happiness, but of turmoil and pain; but it is nevertheless a story which must be told.

Consult with a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of filing for FERS Disability Retirement benefits, lest the happiness only in stories remains so while the pain of life counters the possibility of something more.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire