Happy New Year, 2021

With the tock of the clock, a New Year is welcomed.  The previous tick glanced upon the year prior — the one which everyone wishes would fade from our memories (or almost everyone, as there are allegedly some high-riding investors who have enriched themselves upon the backs of the rising markets).

It has been a tumultuous year — from the Pandemic to the daily numbers of those who became sick, hospitalized or died as a direct or indirect result; to the national elections; the devastation of economic shut downs and partial restrictions; and of the growing isolation, depression and loneliness from forced social distancing; the loss of job, identity and financial ruin; these, and many more issues, define the year of 2020.  We find great comfort in bifurcating the two years — 2020 from 2021.

The reality, of course, is that time is a continuum, and any division is merely a mental discipline of compartmentalization involving the artifice of “before” and “after”. Yet, it is a necessary separation which neatly divides and comfortingly categorizes. The “new” in the “year” is a welcome change, and the tock following the tick will surely bring forth cheers of declarative relief. Happy New Year — 2021.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: The Stuff of Life

Living life is difficult — for, it is the stuff of life which we must endure and experience which is comprised of the struggle and (often) sadness which we call “living”.

There are enough “escapes” which we embrace: of a novel which takes us into a different universe; a movie which transports us to another time; or the Internet, where we can create a different me than the one which lives the life I live.  Other species, or course, are unable to stand apart from ourselves and view the life we live: Instead, they merely “live”.

Medical conditions are, unfortunately, a part of this living — of the recognition of deterioration, change and challenges which must be met.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who must contend with adding to the stuff of life — of a medical condition on top of the daily struggles we must engage and overcome — FERS Disability Retirement benefits are there to fight for.

Contact an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and consider the stuff of life which includes both a medical condition and the need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits — and the struggle to fight for your right to those benefits you worked so hard to earn.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire