Federal Disability Retirement: The Grace of Good Health

It is true in both senses: of the grace of movement which good health allows for, and the grace bestowed in allowing for good health.  When that grace is withdrawn, we suddenly recognize how much we took it for granted.

We cannot, of course, live our days constantly thankful for that gift; for, if we constantly declare how “thankful” we are, we would waste our time by not doing what good health provides: the capacity to live a productive life — aside from the fact that it is irritating to meet a person who is constantly saying things like, “Oh, I am so thankful!” Or “Isn’t it great to be alive!”

The point is to show one’s appreciation by living well, and to not abuse or misuse the grace which is bestowed.  It is fine to be thankful; it is irritating to keep thanking over and over again, and becomes an embarrassment after the third time.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the grace of good health has been partially withdrawn.

It is not, fortunately, “total disability” which needs to be proven, but a lesser legal standard of being unable to perform one or more of the essential elements of your Federal or Postal job.  For that, you can be thankful, and can more easily meet the legal criteria for Federal Disability Retirement — but please, not to an irritating degree.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer