Monthly Archives: October 2021

Postal & Federal Employee Disability Benefits: Consider the Alternatives

It is a cognitive activity which we must all do — or, at the very least, which is forced upon us even when we don’t want to.  It is interesting how some people are simply unable to engage in the mental process of such consideration — whether because they were never “taught” how to sequentially weigh and prioritize, or because the “making” of the decision puts too great a finality upon one’s life.

In either case, it is often necessary to consider the alternatives, then to make a decision, then to act upon the decision.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are considering filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, the foundational basis in coming to a decision to file for Federal Disability Retirement under FERS, through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, consist of a 3-fold question:  How is my health?  Can I make it to “regular retirement”?  If I continue in my present circumstances, will my health suffer such that if I make it to regular retirement, I will not be able to enjoy it?

In the end, considering the alternatives is a matter of prioritizing one’s life — of health versus work, of now versus the future, of values versus things, etc.  To become better informed in order to properly consider the alternatives, contact an OPM Disability Lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and take that information in making the proper decision for your life, your future, and the alternatives which you may not even know about.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Disability Retirement: Doubt

Is it an emotion.  Or, is it an “instinctive sense”?  Perhaps a cognitive level of reasoned thought?  If the latter, do animals doubt?  Why do we often qualify it by adding the term, “a sense of”?

The dictionary definitions often avoid the doubt of doubt by including both: “A feeling of uncertainty or lack of conviction”.  Note the inclusion of both: Emotion (“feeling”) and Reason (“conviction”).  Whether of a feeling or of a rational basis, it allows one to pause, to ponder, to consider the various signs and symbols of life’s intractable problems, and to consider whether or not to move forward.

As you enter your house or apartment, does the door slightly ajar make you doubt?  Do certain indicators at work — of furtive glances, of avoidance by your supervisor, of closed-door meetings excluding you: Do they in the aggregate create a doubt?

Or, for Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are not quite sure as to the qualifying criteria in filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management — is there a doubt?

Whether of a “feeling” or of a rational basis, you should contact an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law in order to cast aside any sense or idea of a doubt.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement: The Autopilot of Smooth Sailing

We all have a tendency of doing that — of placing the metaphorical “ship of life” on autopilot when there is smooth sailing.  Perhaps that is right — for, it takes effort and manual control when rough waters are encountered (continuing with the metaphor), but the reality is that we should be working on expected difficulties precisely when the sailing is smooth: i.e., when we have the time to attend to the anticipated difficulties.

But life is too busy; we are too exhausted to attend to those anticipated problems; and when presented with an opportunity to simply put the ship on autopilot and take a nap, we do so because we need the rest and temporary respite away from all of life’s problems.

It is all well and good for the super-wealthy to talk about how life should not be bifurcated into “work life” and “personal life”, but rather, should be seen as a Zen-like circle where both aspects are fully enjoyed (who made such an inane statement?  Hint — the owner of a monopoly who recently went into space and whose company is featured prominently in the novel and movie, “Nomadland”).

For the super-wealthy, it matters not the distinction between work and personal space; presumably, in either sphere, you are increasing your wealth and so the “personal” becomes the “work” and vice versa.

For the rest of us, we need the bifurcation — of a time away in order to reenergize our batteries.  Life is so exhausting these days that the autopilot of smooth sailing tends to dominate, and we are unable to attend to the times of rough waters.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition and can no longer perform all of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the “rough waters” are likely prevailing, but you do not have the energy to get off of autopilot.

That is when you need to contact an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin to maneuver the craft caught in rough waters through the treacherous waves of the Federal Disability Retirement process.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal and Postal Employee Disability Retirement Law: At Its Worst

We can all be at our best — so long as we are never tested.  We can talk, and talk some more, about what we “would have done” had we been in such-and-such situation.  And since we relegate our military to men and women who are the economically-disadvantaged — instead of a draft which would impact all sectors of society — we can talk endlessly about what we “would have done” if we were in this situation or that.

We can say we will never do X — until we are actually confronted with the circumstances which constitute X; and a person can give a vow, have children based upon that vow, and years later renounce the vow without blinking an eye.  “Well, we drifted apart”; “The circumstances changed”; “He/she didn’t want to be married anymore” — and on and on.  But what about the vow?  Silence.

The test of virtue is not mere words; rather, it is the actions which result from actual circumstances encountered.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, you may have seen your Agency or the Postal Service at its best — because nothing has tested its response to what you are going through.

Unfortunately, experience has taught that Federal Agencies and the Postal Service reveal their true character when confronted with an issue at its worst — such as treating an individual who needs to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Don’t be foolish and assume your Agency or the Postal Facility will respond and treat you the same as when things were going smoothly and everyone was at their best, for such is not the test of character; it is when things are at its worst when the true test is applied.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Postal & Federal Disability Retirement: The Abridged Edition

Is it a better one?  Had the original version been reviewed by a more thorough editor, would the now-considered-abridged edition merely be the first issuance of the original edition?

Writers have noted that the writing itself is not the difficult part; it is going back through the written work and editing it, which is the trauma of the act itself.  From thought-to-paper: Often, when we re-read what has been written, we recognize that the thought we once considered to be brilliant, is somewhat less so.

Editing encounters multiple difficulties — not the least of which is verbosity.  Too many words to express a simple idea can derail the effectiveness of conveying that idea by muddling its simplicity.  But that is the point, isn’t it — to remain on and convey the point itself?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, it is important to consider the “abridged edition” of your case in order to effectively present and convey your Federal Disability Retirement application to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Tolstoy’s War and Peace is likely not the way to win a Federal Disability Retirement case with OPM; on the other hand, Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea may be too abridged; somewhere in-between, like a good John Le Carre thriller.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Disability Retirement from Federal Gov. Employment: The Viable Argument

In this postmodern era, is there such a thing?  What was once illogical — or, even worse, absurd — is now considered an acceptable and viable argument.

Logical fallacies are accepted; non-sequiturs are fully embraced; whether or not the “middle term” is carried over from the major premise to the minor is irrelevant; and “just because” is nowhere blinked at, as the final conclusion to every argument these days is that “everyone is entitled to his or her opinion” and it matters not whether specific facts undermine a viewpoint expressed.

Thus, does it even make a difference whether or not an argument is “viable” enough?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are considering filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management under FERS, an argument used in attempting to persuade OPM to approve your Federal Disability Retirement application is one which must appeal to the Statute, the Regulations, or to MSPB and/or Federal Circuit Court of Appeals Case-Law precedents.

Yes, there is still a distinction between an irrelevant, weak and inconsequential argument, and a viable one.  The viable argument is one based upon facts, the law, and an irrefutable delineation logical fortitude.  In order to make the viable argument, contact an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Medical Retirement Law.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) Disability Retirement: What We Don’t Know

Age brings us closer to realizing the truth of Socrate’s refrain: That I really don’t know anything or, more to the point, much of anything.

Youth allows for brashness of arrogance; in middle age, perhaps some slight hesitancy; of getting older, one realizes the extent of or lack, and the vast knowledge which we will never be able to understand.  Most people “wing it” — in other words, act “as if” they have some knowledge, that they possess an “expertise” or some secret to an apparent success attained.

Social Media, Facebook, Instagram — these, of course, mask and hide the inadequacies behind the facade of competency.  Few people nowadays admit to an imperfection, a lack of, an ignorance for, etc.  Thus do we no longer have the Socratic Method where questions are peppered in order to reveal the disguised ignorance which most people walk about with.

But let’s be clear: What we don’t know can, in fact, hurt us, and to fail to acknowledge one’s lack of knowledge can have dire consequences.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal Service employees who intend on filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS, you should take the time to read the case-law which has developed and evolved over many decades, in order to at least understand the underlying issues which can complicate a Federal Disability Retirement application.

Or, contact a Federal lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and let him inform you of what you don’t know.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement Law: Places We Don’t Want to Be

Of actual places, or even of situations — of places we don’t want to be or circumstances we would rather not find ourselves in — of which we never think about.

It is interesting that the human mind gravitates toward the positive — Of places we would like to visit, books we would like to read, people we would like to meet, etc.  Is that the power of “positive thinking”, or of daydreams relishing the imagination filling the void which otherwise haunts our lives?

Sometimes, however, it is fruitful — and even necessary — to consider the potential negatives which may loom upon the horizon in order to prepare for contingencies in the event of a calamity.

The Federal or Postal worker would rather not contemplate a future in which he or she is no longer able to perform one or more of the essential elements of his or her job; or, there may come a time when your agency places you on a Performance Improvement Plan and initiates actions which leads to a removal — all, places you don’t want to be, but must consider.

Perhaps filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS is a place you would rather not be — but again, it may be necessary to consider.

For those places you don’t want to be, contact an OPM Disability Lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement benefits, which is actually the first step in moving towards a place where you may actually want to be — of receiving a retiree annuity for OPM Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.