Federal Employee Medical Retirement: The Calendar

It rules every day and moment of our lives; yet, we feel out of synch with it, like the rip tide which pulls against the direction you wish to swim towards.

Every now and again, we read about more primitive societies who once possessed a biological affinity to the world around; but within the concrete jungle — or jumble — of technology and civilization’s dominance by construction, we have lost any sense of that.

And so we look out through the window at the stars and the moon, however dimly and distant they appear, misted (or misled) and obscured by the noise and artificial lights surrounding, and allow our lives to be controlled by the calendar of activities: Of chores to be done; of work to be accomplished; of deadlines to be met.

But that the full moon makes wildlife still a bit “off”, whether we believe in such mythologies of antiquated misgivings; but we take no notice.  Whether the baying of a dog during a full moon, or of skittish horses in the wild; no, it is the calendar which obscures, dominates, overrides it all.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers suffering from a medical condition, preventing the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of the Federal or Postal job — the most important notation on your calendar is the one for medical appointments and treatment modalities.  But you may have already exhausted your available leave and your agency won’t allow you to take LWOP anymore.

You probably need to file for Federal Disability Retirement under FERS, through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.  Put the notation in your calendar: Contact a disability attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and don’t let the moon lead you to howl in despair; after all, it’s the calendar which makes us do it.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Disability Retirement: Memorial Day 2022

It is a day of solemn observance; an obligation to actually pause and do something — to remember, to honor, to engage in memory, even if there is no one personally “known” to have made the ultimate sacrifice.  For, a nation which fails to remember is one which is destined to repeat its mistakes; and it is only fitting that this commemorative day is celebrated just before the traditional festivities of summer.

And the best way to remember is through gathering and celebrating — of families getting together around a barbecue and sharing memories of loved ones once present but now represented by an empty chair, or of stories from long ago — grandparents of another era, great grand-nieces and nephews now captured only by fading photographs where stillness and smiles are dotted with age.

Both as a day of solemn remembrance and of celebratory festivities, Happy Memorial Day, 2022.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement Law: Perfection’s Harm

It has been stated by many, that one should never let perfection be the enemy of the good; in other words, one can always delay and delay, arguing that whatever the project being attended to, the goal aimed for, it is simply not good enough because it is not perfect.

Can imperfect beings ever achieve perfection?  Or, is perfection merely the justification for procrastination, knowing that the goal which never can be attained will forever remain as a potentiality steeped in the angst of our own imperfections?

“Good enough”, of course, is a relative standard which all perfectionists are uncomfortable with; for, an employer who accepts such a standard is in danger of relinquishing high standards replaced by an ad hoc, mediocre acceptance of “less than” — which is never a paradigm one attempts to aspire to.  But perfection’s harm is of eternal procrastination; for, we can always find a reason why something is not “good enough”, without ever asking the natural follow-up question: Good enough for what?

In the abstract, “perfection” is an admirable goal to achieve, for it involves a standard envisioned by the visionary few; but in the practical world, perfection’s harm is the aspiration of a would-be god, an idol of idiocy, an apex of folly.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition where the medical condition continues to prevent the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the procrastination resulting from perfection’s harm is that the Federal employee believes that his or her medical condition will miraculously resolve itself, and allow for continuation in the Federal or Postal job.  But that is perfection’s lair — of tomorrow, or the next day.

Contact a Federal Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and consider perfection’s harm — of the impracticality of which you already know, precisely because the medical condition itself has already established and revealed that man’s life on earth is one of perpetual imperfection.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Medical Retirement: The Subtlety of Minimalism

In modernity, it is an art which has been lost.  The flower arrangement which focuses upon a barren branch and a single blossom; a painting reduced to a simplicity uncomplicated; a life without many possessions; a quietude within the bustle of tremendous activity.

The clutter of modern living compels stresses; and yet, is the human body capable of subsuming such high velocity of stresses?  Did evolution allow for enough time to pass so as to develop the resistance to modern stresses?

Anxiety abounds; panic attacks paralyze; depression sets in; the human mind yearns for the subtlety of minimalism, but modern living refuses to submit to such imbalance of desires.

Excess is what modern living requires; and stress is the residual component, the natural but dire consequences.  For, how can the subtlety of minimalism be accepted when all around us the scream of greater expansion yells in a tirade of demanding sponsorship?

We have lost the subtlety of minimalism, its power of quietude, it’s reluctance of dominance.  The “subtle”, by definition, is too delicate to naturally resist the dominance of excess; and “minimalism” is the starvation of gluttony; and together, they face a daunting task against the tide of greed.

Federal employees and U.S. Postal Service Workers who suffer from a medical condition must face that choice; for, the compounding effect both from the disabling medical condition itself and the stresses of needing to work, results in allowing for the dominance of excess.

We choose to replenish the vicious cycle of mental and physical deterioration in a persistent, debilitating way, by choosing modernity’s definition of the “happy life” — of excess.  If it is indeed a choice, then we can also choose to attain the subtlety of minimalism.

Contact a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal or Postal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of turning towards the subtlety of minimalism and away from the bustle of modernity.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Retirement: Parts of the Day

Human beings like to bifurcate, separate, identify, categorize, and otherwise artificially divide time into manageable segments in order to re-order the world to their liking.

This is the simplified explanation of Kant’s distinction between the “phenomenal world” (the one we perceive through our cognitive faculties) and the “noumenal world” — that “objective” universe which we are never able to access because the categories of our human constitution impose upon the raw universe the mental ordering so that we perceive that which is uniquely human.

Thus, “time”, as Augustine viewed it, is merely the human imposition of expectations as to an anticipated future segment, and nothing more than a fiction based upon human categorization of past, prevent and future.

And of the “parts of the day”?  Perhaps it might go something like the following: Morning coffee period — enjoyable; the slog of late morning; lunch, a quiet respite; the sleepiness after a meal, but somehow to get over the hump of early afternoon; then, watching the clock as the minutes slowly make their way towards the end of a workday; the stress-filled commute back home; home, for last minute chores, children and a good night’s sleep.

With variations, each individual experiences a similar “phenomenal” day, cut up into manageable segments — until an interceding (and interrupting) force appears.  Chronic medical conditions often constitute and comprise that “interruption”.

Fortunately, for Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition, where the medical condition itself alters the Federal or Postal employee’s parts of the day — by necessity, to get through the debilitating symptoms of your disabling health condition — it may not be so simple as the hypothetical division as described herein.

What needs to happen, then, is to prepare an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), so that the parts of the day can look somewhat like the following: Focus on getting better; rest; focus on getting better; rest.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill,
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Disability Retirement: The Human Prerogative

There are other prerogatives connected to other species, like swiftness of predatory hunting for a Cheetah; the sheer power of a Grizzly Bear; or, perhaps of an NBA star who no one even attempts to defend against because, outside of the 3-point circle, there is no point in even trying.

The definition is clear: a “prerogative” is the right or privilege exclusive to a particular individual or class, and so, like an eagle which soars with the power of such privilege, there is no denying that which is the right of that individual, of whatever species we are referring to.

For the Federal employees or U.S. Postal worker who suffers from a medical condition, where the medical condition itself impacts upon the ability and capacity to perform the essential elements of one’s job, it is the prerogative — the human prerogative — to prepare, formulate and file an effective Federal Disability Retirement application through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, under FERS.

Because you are a Federal Government employee or Postal Service worker, it is the exclusive right and privilege to assert your eligibility for Federal Disability Retirement; and indeed, this is the Human Prerogative, as a Federal or Postal employee.

It is the exclusive right — not merely because you are a human being, but because of your privileged status as a Civilian Federal employee or U.S. Postal Service worker — to assert that limited prerogative when the need arises, and if the time comes such that it becomes necessary.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Medical Retirement Law: Impotent Perplexities

We live in a time of perplexities, and where we stare paralyzed with inaction, unable to move, incapable of solving, impotent to act.  “It is too complex”; “It’s not my problem”; “It’s outside of my department”; “Let those who created the problem be responsible for the solution”, etc.

We have come to think that words alone can move the world; and so people spend hours upon countless hours on computers, Smartphones, social media, etc., and stare at a blank slate and believe that by pushing buttons, some modicum of differences can be implemented.

Then, when nothing happens, nothing changes, nothing moves — in a word, perplexities abound and impotence dominates — we become paralyzed with a question mark: Why did nothing happen?  And so we become ensconced within the insularity of our linguistic conundrums, forever impotent in our perplexities, eternally paralyzed by our own inability to find our way out from the maze of our own making.

Medical conditions can result in the paralysis of impotent perplexities; for, in the end, many medical conditions remain as perplexities themselves within the very medical community which declares science as the pinnacle of human achievement.

Furthermore, for Federal employees and Postal Service workers, here is another perplexity which may confound you: How do you maneuver through the Leviathan of bureaucracies like that of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management?

Consider hiring an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and have an advocate who knows the ins and outs of maneuvering through the impotent perplexities of a confounding bureaucracy in preparing, formulating, filing and getting an approval of a Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Medical Retirement: Intransigence of Thought

It is when you cannot move forward, or perhaps will not; and where paralysis becomes a habit of living.  Old people often fall into that trap, where laziness is misinterpreted for conviction or when we rely upon the rightness of something merely because “that is the way it has always been done,” or by waving one’s hand and saying, “That is the old way of doing things.”

Leo Strauss was a philosopher who never accepted the truth of a proposition merely because something was accepted from ancient times.  Intransigence of thought, of course, can be caused by mere arrogance; often, from stupidity coupled with ignorance; and more than a few times, from sheer laziness.  But paralysis of thought and the intransigence of thought (which amount to the same thing) can lead to stagnation and lack of progress.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a disabling medical condition and remain in a state of intransigence, it is often the case that the medical condition itself can result in the intransigence of thought.  Moving “beyond”, or even just moving forward, by small and incremental steps, can break you out of that state of intransigence.

Contact a FERS Medical Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of getting beyond your paralysis by having a competent attorney represent you in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Retirement Benefits: Drifting

We all do it; or, more likely, it merely happens to us.  The importance is not so much whether we are, but whether it is towards something, or away.  If it is drifting away, without a direction towards something, then there is the danger of isolation, desolation and despair.  If it is being adrift — but with some direction and ultimately “towards” some direction or goal — then it is a positive thing, and not merely a negation and a chasm leading to nothingness.

We cannot — all of us, every waking moment and every minute of our lives — be purposeful, goal-oriented, and with certainty of hope.  If we were, we would merely be angels and divine agents, and not the fallible human beings we are meant to be.  Don’t be so hard on yourself; for, drifting is part of life’s meanderings, and there is nothing wrong with being lost every now and again, especially when such drifting may lead us to encounters more fruitful than merely existing as the busy little beavers we are always asked to be.

When drifting is a merely an interim period, a temporary state, then it is merely a “stage before” and will likely lead to something positive.

For Federal employees, of course, as well as U.S. Postal workers (both of whom fall into the category of FERS employees) who suffer from a medical condition where the medical condition leads one adrift, consider contacting a FERS Disability Attorney when you are ready, in order to guide and direct you in the right direction, in preparing, formulating and filing an effective FERS Disability Retirement application through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management under FERS.

Drifting is good; purpose is even better; and when the drifting is over, it is a good thing to redirect your goals and obtain a Federal Disability Retirement annuity in order to redirect your priorities so that your health becomes the end-goal in the drifting period of your life.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Law: Falling Through the Cracks

Where did that phrase originate from?  It often refers to small things slipping through without getting noticed because of their insignificance, whether because of size or lack of notoriety.  Children who lack popularity are often thought to be in danger of falling through the cracks — of not being given their due attention; of being ignored; of failing to be noticed.

The amazing thing is that we ever even notice it at all; for, by and large, most of us fall into the category of enforced anonymity — of being in danger of falling through the cracks.  Whether you are the “star” of the class or the “appointed one” whose every move is ooh-ed and ahhh-ed — most everyone else is of the ordinary ilk, unnoticed, ignored or otherwise already having fallen through the cracks.

Federal employees who suffer from a medical condition fall into that category — of either having fallen through the cracks, or about to fall through the cracks.  This is because the medical condition itself relegates the Federal and Postal employee into the category of the “outcast” — of those who have fallen through the cracks.

Contact a FERS attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and see whether or not you might qualify to fall through the cracks of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and land upon the other side where you can become a Federal Disability Retirement annuitant, where falling through the cracks will allow you to prioritize your life and focus upon the more important elements of a life of health and well-being.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill,
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.