OPM Medical Retirement: Have a Happy 4th

Happy 4th of JulyHave a happy and safe 4th of July!!!

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Happy New Year, 2021

With the tock of the clock, a New Year is welcomed.  The previous tick glanced upon the year prior — the one which everyone wishes would fade from our memories (or almost everyone, as there are allegedly some high-riding investors who have enriched themselves upon the backs of the rising markets).

It has been a tumultuous year — from the Pandemic to the daily numbers of those who became sick, hospitalized or died as a direct or indirect result; to the national elections; the devastation of economic shut downs and partial restrictions; and of the growing isolation, depression and loneliness from forced social distancing; the loss of job, identity and financial ruin; these, and many more issues, define the year of 2020.  We find great comfort in bifurcating the two years — 2020 from 2021.

The reality, of course, is that time is a continuum, and any division is merely a mental discipline of compartmentalization involving the artifice of “before” and “after”. Yet, it is a necessary separation which neatly divides and comfortingly categorizes. The “new” in the “year” is a welcome change, and the tock following the tick will surely bring forth cheers of declarative relief. Happy New Year — 2021.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Have a Merry Christmas

No one likes to be the grinch of any Christmas — even of 2020. It will not soon be forgotten. Christmas is about relationships, and the pandemic of 2020 has devastated the personal connections so integral in forming, establishing, maintaining and developing personal and professional relationships. One could, of course, be an optimist and make the argument that if there is to be social distancing, extreme care of contact, etc., then the compensation accorded by this technological age (Zoom and other types of video-conferencing, etc.) makes 2020 as the best time for a viral and infectious disease. It is the “at least” argument — at least we can still stay in contact; at least we can “see” each other; at least… Ultimately, optimism is the best feature of humanity, for it allows for a hopeful outlook to the future; and so we tip our hats to Christmas of 2020, close our eyes and dream of fairies, gnomes, Santa Clause and his helpers, and bid everyone a Merry Christmas, 2020.
Sincerely, Robert R. McGill, Esquire

FERS Disability Retirement: Happy Thanksgiving 2020

2020 has been a tumultuous year.  From the COVID-19 Pandemic to the rancorous political season; from shutdowns, the constant misery of disease, death and debilitating after-effects of this virus to a government paralyzed by partisanship; from the political turmoil of the recent election to the incessant drumbeat of a democracy tested by its own words; throughout, there has been little pause to consider the basis for our thankfulness.

Yet, this is the time to take stock of the things we appreciate.  We can be rocked by the daily blast of news cycles, but when we sit down for Thanksgiving — whether alone or with our immediate family — are there not moments of joy in considering what we have, as opposed to what we have lost? Loss is a part of living; recognition of what we have retained, a slice of joy; and always, to be thankful for a future yet hopeful, and of little things to cherish. Stay safe; stay healthy.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

OPM Medical Retirement: Have a Happy 4th

Happy 4th of JulyDuring this pandemic, when concerns continue to abound about the spread of the Covid-19 Virus — of the potentiality for infecting others, as well as becoming infected yourself — it is difficult to step outside of the yearly rituals of embracing family traditions, celebratory events and the customary activities which one is used to.

Tradition is important; family events, more so; and of ritualistic habits — well, that is precisely what children look forward to. Such yearly family traditions result in precious memories and provide the foundation for a stable and happy childhood. But this year is different. With the shadow of the virus all around us, let’s try and maintain traditions and habits, but in a safe and responsible manner. Have a happy — and safe — 4th of July.

Sincerely, 

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

FERS Disability Retirement: Merry Christmas – 2019

Another year, gone.  It is the time of festivities; of families traveling great distances in order to gather together and engage in traditions created, memories served and food plentifully prepared; and then to share in the gift-giving — a secular occasion, to be sure, but with roots spanning centuries and across cultures and religious roots and customs. Remember always that perfection is not the goal and failing to achieve it is not a reason to despair.  In the end, it is also not a contest to receive the most “stuff”, but rather, to reestablish relationships frayed or otherwise strained, and to enjoy the company of those who would make the effort to join in the singularly-appointed time of coming together.  Merry Christmas to all, and a Happy New Year.
Sincerely, Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Happy Thanksgiving

May all of the blog visitors and forum participants, past and present, and future ones who have yet to visit and contribute to this compendium of information relevant to Federal and Postal employees, set aside some time to celebrate this occasion for food, family and gatherings to “reconnect”, in giving thanks for the blessings received throughout the year, and for that last portion of succulent turkey which the uninvited uncle is wont to grab.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Happy 4th of July

Happy 4th of JulyI hope everyone takes some time off and spends it with one’s family. Be safe, and try to have some time for reflection and refreshment.

Sincerely, 

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

OPM Disability Retirement Retirement: 2019, The New Year

It has a familiar ring to it; of a harkening to a recent past that has a melodic cadence reminding one of a famous book by George Orwell.  It is because of the “19” that we are reminded of it.  Can it have already been 35 years in passing?  “But it’s not quite as bad as all of that,” we say, and perhaps such a sentiment is right: Pox on the negativism of predictions of doom!

No, we do not have flat screens forced upon us which spy into our lives; instead, we went out and purchased them ourselves — voluntarily — and realized only later that the camera embedded can, indeed, record our every movements.  And we learned that all of that personal information shared with friends and family have been stored and disseminated to forums and facades not otherwise intended; and so everything private has become public, and there is nothing left but the shell of who we are.

But enough of that; we celebrate the coming of a new year not for the unwanted fears of the past, but because the future can always bring about change, greater prosperity and a glimmer of hope for things yet to come.  It may well be that 2019 is that very year we have been waiting for — a dawn of new beginnings.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition, where the medical condition no longer allows for you to continue in your present job, the incoming New Year may be an opportunity for change, by preparing, formulating and filing an effective FERS Disability Retirement application.  Consult with a knowledgable attorney and begin the process early, as OPM is way behind and it is important to get in line.  2019 — Happy New Year.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Medical Retirement for Federal Workers: These Holidays

Do We dread, or welcome them?  Is it a season to which we look forward, or hope that they will quickly fade into memories best left forgotten?  Is it to endure, tolerate, give a plastic smile to, or do we guffaw uproariously where our hearts flutter with sincere flushes of joyful tears?

On the other hand, must our emotions always be bifurcated into extremes of disjunctives?  Must it be “Either/Or” (to borrow Kierkegaard’s Title to his opus magnum)?  Can it not be some compromised “middle ground” where we enjoy certain parts of it, tolerate with indifference others, and leave the rest to the ash heaps of eternal drawers shuttering away in memories unrevealed?

The “Holidays” are a time of bustle; and though we complain of the “commercialism” of the modern era, we refrain and restrain ourselves because we know that, to do so is to be tagged a “Scrooge”; and so we quietly acquiesce, “go with the flow” and smile wanly as the world decorates itself in preparation for a single day in a time of multiple troubles.

But in the end, isn’t it nice to “make-believe?”  For, there are always the tomorrows and the day after; the day before, and other times of mundane and common occurrences, and to celebrate one out of all of those “others”, even if tomorrow brings back the reality of tumults and memories of better yesterdays — still, through it all, it is nice to gather around and sing a Christmas carol, to light a candle, to bow in prayer for thanks and wishes.

In the end, it is — after all — these Holidays that matter not because the world says so, but because we have an excuse to be with family, friends, hug and laugh, if only for a day in remembrance of these holidays.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and have a Happy New Year.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire