Qualifying for FERS Disability Retirement: How Hard is It?

That is a question which is entirely dependent upon the individual facts and circumstances of the case at hand.

Everyone would like to believe that his or her Federal Disability Retirement case is a “sure thing”.

Some attorneys, perhaps, offer a “money-back guarantee” — but what is such a guarantee worth?  To merely return the money, or some portion of it, if a case has failed to be approved?  How hard do you think such an attorney will fight for your case if it gets denied at the First Stage of the process and it appears that the U.S. Office of Personnel Management is going to fight to deny your case at every level of the administrative process?

There are few, if any, “slam dunk” cases, and OPM is a Federal Agency which guards its territory as if their life depended upon it — and well they should, as every Federal Disability Retirement application should be scrutinized to the extent that each must meet the legal criteria for approval and valid viability.  But that is where the dispute and the battleground exists: It is the interpretation of the law and its interpretive application to each individual case.

Contact an OPM Disability Attorney who will fight for an approval of your Federal Disability Retirement case — one who has the experience, wisdom and fortitude to aggressively pursue your Federal Disability Retirement benefits, no matter how hard it is.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement: The Importance of Sequence

When and how do we learn that sequence is important?  Step B must follow A, and C comes after B, etc.  What happens if you perform B after C, and C before A?  It all depends, doesn’t it?

If random performance of a task has no impact upon the ultimate outcome, then such arbitrariness of selecting any given point in a sequence of events or assigned tasks is acceptable and workable.  It is when sequence matters — of the necessity of performing a specific task within a sequence of tasks — that one must first recognize why there is an underlying importance and significance in the final submission or conclusion of a project, task, etc.

For Federal and Postal employees who are contemplating formulating and submitting a Federal Disability Retirement application, sequence is important.  How one formulates the case — the legal arguments to be submitted, the medical documentation to be gathered, reviewed and coordinated; the Applicant’s Statement of Disability — of the “when” — are all important in formulating an effective Federal Disability Retirement application.

Consult with an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and recognize, understand and implement the importance of sequence in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Employees with Disabilities: Making the Decision

There are always multiple factors which must be considered — of a career invested; financial viability; of a self-image still lingering of a more vibrant self from a mere few years ago; of not being able to let go of the daily routine despite the added stresses, the suspicious looks from coworkers, the fear of your agency’s initiation of further restrictions and potentially adverse actions, including a Performance Improvement Plan (a “PIP”), or leave restrictions, proposed removal, etc.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition where the medical condition impacts your ability and capacity to perform your job duties, making the decision to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management is a difficult decision which must take into consideration multiple factors. Of all of the factors to consider, however, the first one which should be understood is whether or not you may or may not be eligible for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

Contact and consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement benefits and call a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: Learning a New Language

Perhaps, with modern technology, there is little need — or incentive — to do so.  There are “apps” for foreign languages, translation of phrases, and electronic dictionaries to convert concepts from one’s native tongue into esoteric languages of foreign origins.  And, like testing one’s knowledge and memory, something has been lost with the rise of technological ease.  No longer is it necessary to try and communicate by trial-and-error combined with over-exaggerated hand gestures, universal sign languages and facial expressions of grave frustrations.

No — we all just turn to our Smart Phones and allow for technology to perform the working of learning a new language.

In some instances, however, not even modern technology can assist in learning a “new language” — such as the language of Federal Disability Retirement Law.  For, in many senses, a Federal or Postal worker attempting to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits must indeed learn a new “language” — of the rules of eligibility; of what constitutes a legally viable accommodation; of foreign terms and legal concepts which must be understood and grasped before moving forward.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, contact a “translator” who can assist and guide you in learning a new language — a Federal Disability Retirement lawyer.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Early Retirement for Federal Employees with Disabilities: Persuasion

Can the written word persuade?  Can “passion” be elicited by a series of letters, dots, crossing “t’s” and other such grammatical nuances?

Certainly, when language is spoken, we often hear discussions about the “passionate” delivery, or the fact that the speaker was “fiery”, a “true believer”, or even “inspiring”, etc.  Somehow, and for whatever reasons, we attach the emotional component of a speaker’s voice with the persuasive force of sincerity upon the words themselves.  Can it ever be “faked”?

We are too often too naive to think not; and that, of course, is what the con-man and the counterfeiter is banking upon.  Persuasion offered by an impassioned voice is much easier than the power of the written word; for, articulated with the right barometer of a voice’s pitch, it tugs at one’s hearts and confuses the otherwise skeptical mind.  A paper presentation must persuade through the force of logical argumentation; for, there exists no voice of passionate conveyance to do otherwise.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal of Postal job, filing a Federal Disability Retirement application with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management must by necessity be a paper-presentation to OPM.  To be persuasive is thus doubly-difficult, as you must make sure that all of your arguments are articulated with soundness of reasoning and forceful in their legal relevance.

Consult with a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and make sure that your method of persuasion matches the substantive weight of you circumstances.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement Benefits: Of History Unknown

Many of us consider ourselves to be “history buffs” — we are proud that we can accurately recite the beginning dates and end-dates of major wars; of knowing the primary principals of each; of the sequence of Presidents; of who was shot and by whom; of when Fort Sumter was fired upon; of the day that Wall Street crashed, etc.

Dates are important to us; they provide a context for our present circumstances.  Yet, history is also about individual lives — often lost in the anonymity of greater events, and few of us have the imagination to appreciate how previous lives were lived — of not having indoor plumbing; of getting water from a well; of not having a refrigerator; of being so poverty-stricken that death by famine was often a perennial cycle of acceptance.

Other people, and other lives we barely even know or consider.  We barely know our next door neighbor, and yet we pride ourselves in accurately reciting authors from esoteric works of history.  Of the history unknown, they remain a mystery.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who have a sense that your contribution to the Federal Agency is somewhat akin to the history unknown — of relevance no longer appreciated and work left unappreciated — it may be time to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.  You medical condition has essentially rendered you a “non-person”.  You are no longer a member of the “mission team”.

Consult with a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and consider fading away with a Federal Disability annuity by joining the multitude of the History Unknown — or as General MacArthur once said, “Old soldiers never die, they simply fade away.”  And so for the history buffs: Where did he say it and in what year?

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Medical Retirement from Civil Service: The Unendurable Turmoil

Perhaps (and thankfully) for most, there does not exist one.  Turmoils are a part of everyday life.  Most are endured; some small numbers of them are actual “emergencies” which require urgent attention, but for the most part, life is a series of upheavals which has to be endured.

There comes, however, every now and again, an unendurable turmoil — a circumstance of such immense importance and of great impact such that it seems to be unendurable.  It is the moment during or just after a crisis; a recognition that things simply cannot go on like they have; a “breaking point” where something must give.  That point prior to the explosion or where the dam suddenly breaks and the massive flood of life’s fears begins, is the pressure point where help must be sought, attention must be obtained, advice must be acquired.

Medical conditions can bring a person to such a crisis point — especially where the intersection of work, family, pain and fear all aggregate and come to a “head”.  For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition and need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, don’t allow for your particular situation to culminate to a point where it becomes an unendurable turmoil.

Instead, consult with an OPM Disability Retirement Lawyer and get some advice.  Such advice from a Federal Disability Retirement Lawyer may be that proverbial last straw before it is placed on the camel’s back which prevents the situation from becoming the unendurable turmoil.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Medical Retirement for Federal Employees: The Perfect Case

If planning leads to perfection, does it necessarily follow that lack of planning renders its opposite?

There are rarely perfect cases in a Federal Disability Retirement application.  Most people do not go to their doctors with the predetermined view of filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, and most doctors (other than those specializing in providing disability assessments, evaluations, etc.) are there to treat their patients in hopes of ameliorating the underlying medical condition.

If “planning” is what makes for perfection, then lack of planning — in other words, just “living life” — makes for the imperfect case, and that is where the U.S. Office of Personnel Management pounces upon and attempts to characterize such imperfections as a valid basis for denying a Federal Disability Retirement application.

Thus, it is important for a Federal employee or U.S. Postal worker to consult with a Federal Disability Retirement Lawyer once you begin thinking about the future need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.  For, while there may never be a “perfect case”, some amount of thoughtful planning prior to submitting an OPM Disability Retirement application is necessary in order to get as close to perfection as possible.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire