Federal Gov. and USPS Disability Retirement: The Rise

It is attributed to objects and people; the sun does it in the morning and the moon at night; tides rise and fall; employment rates, statistical variables; the careers of people; and for this coming week, the anticipation of religious significance and theological arguments over the historical occurrence of a matter specifying an Easter Event.

As a noun, it is used to describe great historical events of a period: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire; the Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, etc.  In entertainment circles, a variation of it is often applied, as in, “is X in or out?”, or “Is Y up or down?” Whether the bread rises sufficiently, or we miss witnessing the sun rise on any particular day, shows the vast array of elasticity in how we apply a particular concept in everyday usage.

Technically, of course, neither the sun nor the moon ever “rise”; rather, the rotational perspective from any given viewpoint provides an illusion of such a phenomena.  When it comes to describing the state of an object, such loose usage of language is harmless; but when applied to a person, one should remain vigilantly sensitive to such choice of descriptive language.

For Federal and Postal employees who suffer from medical conditions, such that their careers “rise or fall”, or their individual and professional status and stature go “up or down”, the impact upon such lives matter beyond everyday and common application of language.  The rising fortunes and falling health of Federal and Postal employees should matter to those beyond family and friends.

The options?  Filing for OPM Disability Retirement benefits is one option.  It is a benefit which is available to all Federal and Postal employees who have the minimum number of years of service, but one which must be proven to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

And what of that event previously referred to for this coming week?  That is the one account where, by those who apply significance to the event, the second half of the description never came about: the rise occurred, but not the fall; or, another way to put it is that the rise conquered the fall.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Medical Retirement for Federal Workers: The Easter Paradigm

Paradigms which are based upon traditional, historical or religious foundations which have had their efficacy tested by time, have a clear advantage over untested social engineering experiments.

Federal Disability Retirement, whether under FERS or CSRS, from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, is a paradigm of recognizing the worth of human productivity, by allowing for payment of an annuity because of a medical condition which prevents one from performing one or more of the essential elements of a particular job; yet, concurrently, allowing for productivity in working at another job, if desired, and if capable.

Thus, the normal reaction for the public at large is often, “Why should you get anything if you can work at some other job?”  The answer is the recognition of the Easter Paradigm:  death and resurrection are not mutually exclusive concepts; similarly, the fact that one is “disabled” does not mean that one cannot continue to contribute within the context of the workforce, but in a different kind of vocation.

The recuperative period of not being forced to work at a particular kind of job allows for the redemptive result of “rising” in another job.  Worth of a human being is recognized in allowing for a “second” chance.  The historical test of a model which has worked, the Easter Paradigm is one of hope and oriented with a view to the future — however long that may be.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Federal and Postal Disability Retirement: Easter

Easter is a time of reflection and rejuvenation for Christians.  It is a designated week of Holy reflection — through capture, suffering, death, resurrection and forgiveness.  In a world where the distinction between the sacred and the profane has blurred to indistinguishable heights of platitudes and uncertainties, to reserve a week in one’s life for that which is “Holy” is indeed a phenomena worth preserving.  Christmas has become a season of celebration in a secular sense, full of traditions and shrieks of joy from the mouths of children; Christmas trees, decorations, presents and surprises; and while I am sure there will be disagreement on this matter, the assimilation of Christmas with a secularization of celebration, for whatever reason, is not disturbing.  Yet, somehow, despite the Easter Bunny, egg hunts and the attempt to merely marginalize Easter as a “time of Spring”, the awe of Easter has retained a reserved, contemplative aura with a special meaning. 

As an attorney who represents Federal and Postal employees with various medical conditions and disabilities, the common thread which I hear on a daily basis is the pain and distress which the human condition is able to endure on a daily basis. I do not equate the human condition and the clients I represent with the suffering which Christ endured; yet, those who suffer clearly have an affinity with the One who suffered on the Cross, yet forgave those who condemned and crucified, for the sake of the world.  I am daily amazed and humbled by the positive attitude and ability to endure, by Federal and Postal workers from all across the United States.  May we all have a sense of humanity within us that we can have forgiveness during this Holy Week.  Happy Easter.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire