Federal Employee Disability Retirement from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management: Procedural Hurdles

Bureaucratic complexities have become a part of everyday life.  When societies become entrenched in administrative procedures, where the process itself is paramount over the substantive goals intended to achieve, and the proper filing of standard forms cannot be ignored lest the conformity of all is undermined by the exception of the singular; then, it is declared that progress has been made, the height of civilization has been achieved, and the pinnacle of human inventiveness has been reached.

Whether one agrees with the satire of bureaucratic conundrums or not, the reality is that the inherent complexities of government must be contended with, and attempting to subvert or otherwise evade the necessity of completing standardized procedural methodologies is an act of futility bordering on rebellion.

For injured/ill Federal employees and Postal Workers who must consider filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, whether one is under FERS or CSRS, or even CSRS Offset, the importance of overcoming procedural hurdles cannot be overstated.  SF 3112A, SF 3112B, SF 3112C & SF 3112D must be completed for all Federal and Postal employees filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, whether one is under FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset; and for FERS Federal and Postal Workers, one must also complete SF 3107 (as opposed to SF 2801 for CSRS & CSRS Offset Federal and Postal employees).

And, while there are ways to provide additional addendum information beyond that which can fit within the neat spaces provided on the standard forms themselves, nevertheless, it is necessary to follow the rules and abide by the bureaucracy of conformity.  Yes, administrative hurdles are a headache and a difficulty to overcome; but, no, you cannot ignore them, as the reality of administrative and bureaucratic headaches is a constancy we must live with in a society deemed to be the pinnacle of human achievement and progress.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Attorney

 

Federal Gov. and USPS Disability Retirement: The Rise

It is attributed to objects and people; the sun does it in the morning and the moon at night; tides rise and fall; employment rates, statistical variables; the careers of people; and for this coming week, the anticipation of religious significance and theological arguments over the historical occurrence of a matter specifying an Easter Event.

As a noun, it is used to describe great historical events of a period: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire; the Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, etc.  In entertainment circles, a variation of it is often applied, as in, “is X in or out?”, or “Is Y up or down?” Whether the bread rises sufficiently, or we miss witnessing the sun rise on any particular day, shows the vast array of elasticity in how we apply a particular concept in everyday usage.

Technically, of course, neither the sun nor the moon ever “rise”; rather, the rotational perspective from any given viewpoint provides an illusion of such a phenomena.  When it comes to describing the state of an object, such loose usage of language is harmless; but when applied to a person, one should remain vigilantly sensitive to such choice of descriptive language.

For Federal and Postal employees who suffer from medical conditions, such that their careers “rise or fall”, or their individual and professional status and stature go “up or down”, the impact upon such lives matter beyond everyday and common application of language.  The rising fortunes and falling health of Federal and Postal employees should matter to those beyond family and friends.

The options?  Filing for OPM Disability Retirement benefits is one option.  It is a benefit which is available to all Federal and Postal employees who have the minimum number of years of service, but one which must be proven to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

And what of that event previously referred to for this coming week?  That is the one account where, by those who apply significance to the event, the second half of the description never came about: the rise occurred, but not the fall; or, another way to put it is that the rise conquered the fall.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Disability Retirement for Federal Government Employees: Different Pockets

There is often a confusion over different pockets and their intersecting relations — of SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance with the Social Security Administration); OWCP administered under the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (OWCP/FECA); Federal Disability Retirement under FERS or CSRS, as approved or denied by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management; and, in addition, there are those who are eligible for VA Disability benefits, for a Scheduled Award from OWCP, and complications which can occur with private disability insurance policies.

The general rule with respect to each can be summarized as follows:  Offset between FERS & SSDI (100% the first year, 60% every year thereafter); one can get approved concurrently for OWCP/FECA, but the Federal or Postal employee must choose to receive from one or the other, and not both; the Federal or Postal employee can receive a scheduled award while at the same time receiving a FERS Disability Retirement annuity, because a Scheduled Award is considered compensation for a rated injury, as opposed to continuation of one’s pay; there is no offset between FERS or CSRS Disability Retirement benefits and VA Disability benefits; private disability policies depend upon the contractual language of the policy itself, and must be reviewed individually as to any provisions of offset or dollar-for-dollar reduction of benefits based upon receipt of any other benefit.

These are the general criteria concerning the intersecting impact of each upon the other.  In the end, reaching into different pockets will normally result in an increase, and rarely (if ever) a decrease of benefits, even with offsets.  However, overreaching, as the case may be, can result in unintended consequences of overpayment and required repayment.  Be aware and informed.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire