Applying for FERS Disability Retirement: Thinking Alone

It is, for the most part, a solitary act.  Yes, yes — there are “asides” and soliloquies that allow for intermingling of thought and statements propounded; but it is the insularity of the act, the privacy of the moment and the continuum of confined deliberation that makes for thinking to be an “alone” activity.

Thus is it a tautology to place the two words side by side: “Thinking” and “Alone”; for, to think is almost always to do it alone, and when one is alone, there is often nothing else to do but to engage in the act of thinking (although, one might quip, looking at most people with their vacant stares, one might substantively dispute such an assumption).

There are, of course, attempts at changing human nature:  Of group therapy; of collectivization of “brain-storming”; and of communal gatherings in order to think out-loud the cooperative interests of intermingling thought-processes; but nevertheless, by and large, thinking alone is an activity of solitary insularity, like Shakespeare’s characters reflecting upon one’s fate and future.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, thinking alone may not be the best course of action. Consult with a Federal Disability Retirement Attorney in coming to a decision concerning one’s best course of action.

For, while the activity of “thinking” may be one that is normally performed “alone”, it is always important to remember that the process of gathering the relevant information in order to do that very activity of “thinking” should never be “alone”, but should include sound advice and counsel from an experienced attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire