Postal & Federal Employee Medical Retirement: The Bumpy Road Ahead

Life is always a rough-hewn piece of wood; and yes, while the grains may possess and reveal beauty, and sanding or polishing may bring out the inner, granular quality which depicts the artistry of nature, still — the bumpy road ahead remains just around the corner.

Sometimes, you see two young people in a cafe gazing dreamily into each other’s eyes, and you have to resist going up to them, slapping them gently over their heads in order to awaken them from the unreality of the moment.  Or, perhaps the better approach is to leave things alone — as life is full of problems and disappointments, let them have their respite of escape from the harshness of reality.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of his or her Federal or Postal job, the bumpy road ahead likely includes the fight against the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in getting a FERS Disability Retirement application approved.

It is always a fight.  And like the rough-hewn piece of wood, it takes hard work to get past the splinters and obstacles before the “beauty” part can be reached.  Contact a lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and let the specialist handle the bumpy road ahead.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Disability Retirement Benefits: The Next Step

There is always one, isn’t there?  From the very beginning of life’s experiences, there has always been the next step.  For the toddler, it wasn’t enough to take the first step — there had to be the second, the third, and every next step thereafter.  It wasn’t enough to learn to read, write, and do some basic arithmetic; you had to take the next step towards higher education in order to remain productive and become employable.

The next step is always the one after the initial and intermediate ones; and even after the last step in the process may have been reached, there will always be another “next step” in the next endeavor, the next experience, the next obligation and the next undertaking.  The last step in life will only come about when we take our last breath — and even that, we shall see whether or not there is a next step in whatever happens on the “other side”.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, contact an attorney who specializes in performing the next step in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS.

For, in obtaining a Federal Disability Retirement annuity successfully, it is always the next step before the next, next step, which is the important one in order to reach the next step, after that.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Disability Retirement from the USPS and other Federal Gov. Agencies: Loyalty in Our Time

As a member of The Band, Levon Helm was a fiercely loyal member who was extremely critical of his fellow musician, Robbie Robertson.  The issue which centered upon the bitter feud involved royalties (as all feuds throughout time immemorial involve money) — of who should receive it; what constitutes “writing” a song; who should get credit for it, etc.

There are many adages which our grandparents used to offer — of sayings beginning with, “There are two types of people in the world”, etc.  One such saying might begin with: “There are two types of people in the world — the Levon Helm type, and the Robbie Robertson type…”

The controversy involved the bifurcation of the following: How is a song written: by the origin of the idea, or by the end product involving a collaborative effort?  Levon Helm believed in the latter approach; Robbie Robertson, in the former.  In the end, what was considered as one of the greatest rock bands in the history of music — a group merely called, “The Band” — disintegrated into a bitter end because of a feud over money and loyalty.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the question of loyalty in our time will test the Federal Agency and the Postal Service.

Should you inform them immediately about your intention to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits?  How will your past loyalty to your Federal Agency or the Postal Service be “repaid” when they find out that you are filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management?  Will the Federal Agency or the Postal Service act like Levon Helm — fiercely loyal — or like Robbie Robertson?

To protect yourself and learn the lesson of loyalty in our time, contact a disability attorney who specializes in OPM Disability Retirement Law.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Medical Retirement for Federal & Postal Workers: The Saddest Story

What makes for a sad story?  What touches us as the saddest story?  Is it a tragedy unexpected — as in, the death of a parent, leaving behind a grieving spouse or partner, and dumbfounded kids?  Or is it the story of a promising young person whose life is cut short by an accident?

Does “fault” matter?  If death or grave injury occurs, does the sadness of the story depend upon whether and to whom one can ascribe blame?  And does intentionality also come in as a factor — of whether the death, injury or unfortunate circumstances resulted from a deliberate and intentional act, or whether it was an “accident” where the event just played itself out without any participatory involvement of the “victim” in a given case?  Or, is the sad or saddest story dependent upon the viewer, the reader, the witness, etc. — of how sensitive that person is, whether he or she possesses an empathic character or one which is somewhat more blunted and callous?

Or, as is more likely — does it depend upon both: Of the story and the receptor in combination to determine the “sadness” of a story or narrative?

In the end, the saddest story combines the elements identified: Of a potentiality cut short; involving circumstances beyond one’s control; where fault cannot be ascribed; and where someone must pay an unwilling price.  Sounds somewhat like a Federal or Postal employee who must file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Of course, there are greater tragedies — where death and grieving widows are concerned; but one should not discount the plight of the Federal or Postal employee who can no longer continue in his or her career, and must file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

Contact an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS, and begin the process of preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application, and preparing the Applicant’s Statement of Disability for OPM to ponder the saddest story.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal and Postal Worker Medical Retirement: The Retreat of Solace

Everyone, without exception, must find that slice of heaven — that retreat of solace.  Whether it is found in reading; in a hobby; a dog to cuddle with; children, for a time, at least; kite flying; stamp collection; even video games????

Life is difficult.  As Hobbes would put it, the “life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short…”.  Has it changed much?  Certainly, some progress has been made.

Reading history, especially about the frontier days in late 18th Century and early 19th Century America — of the constant warring, torture and killings; yet, despite a more “civilized” world (minus Afghanistan and Chicago), life is hard and the retreat of solace is an important element to discover, preserve and protect.

Some find it merely in the lost world of fiction and the novel; others, in more physical activities — a friendly pick-up game of basketball; a weekend round of golf; a solitary walk in the woods.  Whether refreshing one’s insular universe by means of physical exercise of the body, or allowing for a respite of that private world escaping into a fantasy world, the means of such change of scenery depends upon the personality of the individual.

What happens when a medical condition interrupts that retreat of solace?  The insidiousness of chronic pain or constant anxiety makes for the retreat of solace to become untenable, precisely because a temporary escape from this hard reality called “living” is no longer possible.

Filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits allows for the Federal or Postal worker to attain a future security in order to regain the retreat of solace.  Contact an OPM Disability Lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of reasserting the lost ground of the retreat of solace.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

OPM Disability Retirement Benefits: Holding on Too Long

We all have that tendency; we live with the old rule & adage: “throwing good money after bad”; “to abandon is to admit failure”; “maybe tomorrow will be different than today”, etc.

Few of us are able to cut the string or the proverbial umbilical cord when time, circumstances and all indicators reveal to us the wisdom of doing so.  We hold on for too long; we don’t want to admit and face “the facts”; we want to believe that tomorrow is that ray of hope where yesterday was the shadow of darkness, but where darkness was a thing of the past.

Yes, there are rare instances in which stories of hope and rejuvenation profited the stubborn exception; but that is why there are such stories in the first place — they are the exceptions which defied the normal course of most circumstances.

For the Federal employee or U.S. Postal Service worker who suffers from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, holding on too long has more than a price to pay in terms of time wasted; it has to do with your health.

Holding on too long can continue to help deteriorate the health which you are attempting to preserve.

Contact an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of “letting go” — an act of the will, and not merely the words of a Shakespearean fool who brings down the King and his kingdom with a crash of tragedy echoing beyond Lear’s empty ravings.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

Postal & Federal Employee Disability Retirement: The Waiting Game

Doctors are good at it.  They have studied the psychology of impatience.  First, the 15 minute wait in the reception room.  Impatience sets in around that time.  Thus, the transfer into the private patient’s room — but still no sign of the doctor.  No matter; the transfer itself has “renewed” the patient’s patience.  20 minutes there.  Then, an “intake” person asks some questions, then disappears.  This allows for another 10 – 15 minutes.

It is the “incremental” approach — of satisfying the irritation of waiting just enough so that another duration of waiting is allowed for.  If you break up an hour’s worth of waiting into increments of 20 minutes, it doesn’t seem so bad.

Bureaucracies, however, don’t care.  For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, it is often the “waiting game” which is most difficult.  Then, of course, when there is a denial from OPM, it takes that much longer.

No one can guarantee a first-stage approval from OPM, but making sure that an OPM Disability Retirement application is formulated and prepared as best as possible will at least enhance the chances of an approval at any stage, and thus will subvert and undermine the waiting game.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement from OPM: The Other Person

When we were young, a sense of invincibility can set in even when tragedy strikes others, and we are always — somehow — left to spare.  Perhaps we begin to believe that we are “special”, or that fate has something unique for us; or even that our genetic make-up is somewhat superior than others.

Whatever the reasonings, it is always “the other person” who is hit with the bad luck, the seasonal flu, the chronic illness, the bad relationship, left without an umbrella on a rainy day, and multiple other small and larger calamities.  But time and age take care of such things; at some point in life, the “other” person becomes you — and the youthful you becomes the other person who looks at you and says, “I must be different”.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition now prevents you from performing one or more of the essential elements of your Federal or Postal position, you are now that other person — the one who needs to consult with an attorney to discuss the possibility of filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

What you do not want to do is to become like the other person who fails to act, and instead lives out the calamity without a hopeful future.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Postal & Federal Disability Retirement: Competing Interests

It is a concept which is familiar to all; for, within a society where various individuals interact, where each person represents a self-interest and groups of individuals combine to form aggregate (or “corporate”) interests, the competition that develops and erupts is a natural phenomena.

For the most part, society operates well and rather smoothly; courts allow for competing interests that have reached a point where resolution must be arbitrated by a third-party authority; physical violence where competing interests resulted in an altercation are resolved by a criminal judicial system; and a well-trained police force deals with competing interests where laws have been violated.

Between nations, competing interests are often resolved by diplomatic negotiations — or end up in wars, resulting in devastation and famine for the general population.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the competing interest which should be identified are: The applicant, whose interest is to obtain a Federal Disability Retirement benefit; the Federal Agency or Postal Unit, who may or may not be supportive of the employee/applicant, and thus may represent a “first order” competing interest; and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, whose competing interest is to deny, where possible, the employee’s application for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

There is also a fourth “competing interest” — that of a Federal Disability Lawyer who will effectively represent the Federal or Postal employee.

Such a lawyer, however, “competes” against the Agency and OPM, and advocates for the Federal or Postal employee.  Consult with an OPM Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and consider whether or not you need proper legal representation in competing against the competing interests you will be facing in a Federal Disability Retirement application.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement: Preparing the Case for Submission

Sometimes, it only takes a matter of weeks; other times, months and months in the preparation period prior to submission of an OPM Medical Retirement package.  It is not something to be taken lightly.  Once submitted, your Human Resource Office will do their portion — of completing the Agency’s Certification of Reassignment and Accommodation, as well as the other and multiple bureaucratic processes.

Then, whether first to be routed through the finance office and then on to OPM, or if you are separated from service, directly to OPM without going through your Human Resource Office at all (except to separately secure a Supervisor’s Statement and the SF 3112D), the bureaucratic process of submitting and being reviewed for an approval or a denial from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management has begun.

“Preparing the case for submission” may have taken many months, and it is the crucial foundation in setting forth the success or failure of a FERS Disability Retirement application.

Consult with an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, lest the preparation of such an important submission should fall short of meeting the complex criteria necessary for a successful endeavor.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire