FERS Disability Retirement for Civilian Federal Employees: Necessity by Choice

There are always options; it is just that, because some of the alternatives presented are either unfathomable or illogical, we deem them to be “not” viable choices to consider.  The necessity of filing for Federal Employee Disability Retirement under FERS is often viewed in that manner: It is a necessity — yes, by choice, but only because all other options have become untenable.

The Federal employee or U.S. Postal worker does not come to making such a decision because he or she really has any other say in the matter.  Staying at the job with the deteriorating condition is really not an option.  Simply resigning and walking away with nothing to show for all of the hard work expended is unthinkable.

There are, for the few fortunate, the choice of an early retirement, or having reached that MRA crossroad; but such choices are limited and often not economically viable.  And so the necessity by choice must be faced: Unable to continue in the job because of a medical condition, OPM Disability Retirement is the only option left.

Contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal or Postal Disability Retirement application because the necessity has prompted the choosing of the only viable option left.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Medical Retirement under FERS: The Wishes We Wish

People wish all the time.  Whether implicitly through fantasy or daydreaming, or explicitly by prefacing the thought with, “I wish that…” — the wishes we wish are often more revealing than the act of wishing itself.

Are humans the only species which projects upon things not possessed?  Do other species wish for things, circumstances, events and relationships that are not?  Does it border upon insanity to wish for things that are clearly outside of the realm of probabilities, or is it a healthy engagement of one’s time to daydream, wish, imagine and hope for?

Is there a distinction with a difference between a wish and a hope, a fantasy and a wandering daydream, or between a concocted reality and the miserable circumstances within which one exists?  If the difference is between containing one’s wishes within the privacy of one’s mind — on the one hand — and “acting as if” the wish itself is reality, on the other, then the boundary between sanity and its opposite is thin indeed.

Here’s something that tells us much about ourselves: Do we wish for things for ourselves, or for others?  Do we wish for extravagances — like a yacht, a vacation or a revitalization of a lost relationship — or something more mundane, like good health?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s job, the wishes we wish may be common, understandable and mundane — of getting one’s health back.  And while Federal Disability Retirement may not result in better health, it allows for a Federal or Postal employee to extricate one’s self from a workplace situation that only increases the stresses upon one’s health because of the constant worry about being unable to perform the work assigned, and to instead focus upon one’s health and well-being.

In the end, the wishes we wish need to conform to the reality we find ourselves in, and for Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who need to file for Federal Employee Disability Retirement, you should contact a Federal Disability Lawyer who specializes in FERS Disability Retirement Law and allow for some wishes to turn into a reality.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire