USPS and Federal Civil Service Disability Retirement: Human Beings and Railroad Tracks

The metaphor of trains and railroad tracks are numerous and infinite in their applicability and relevance:  train wrecks; inability to stop; actions which proceed with a directional course towards a cliff; predetermined path of existence; and many others, some which invite ontological and teleological issues concerning free will and the ability to have an omniscient vantage point.

For Federal and Postal employees who are suffering from a medical condition such that the medical condition(s) impacts one’s ability/inability to perform all of the essential functions of one’s job, the analogy to a train ride is quite accurate.  For, the course of one’s career is often one which is set at the very beginning — an upward trajectory with expected grade-promotions and regular step increases; a sense of working for an agency with a mission, a purpose, and (perhaps most importantly) a steady paycheck.  But a pre-set course has a disadvantage:  a track from which one cannot stray; yet, if continuing onward, a certainty for a collision, headlong into subpar performance evaluations, a PIP, disciplinary actions, and potential terminations.

A train wreck waiting to happen.

About the go over that proverbial cliff.  Federal Disability Retirement is a benefit available for all Federal and Postal workers, whether under FERS or CSRS, if you meet the minimum eligibility requirements.  Fortunately, humans are not trains; free will and the ability to change course in life is an innate potentiality of the human soul.  But free will, in order to have any effect, must be acted upon.  Mere thought is not the same as action; it is, ultimately, human action which leads to change.  Just some thoughts to ponder.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

CSRS & FERS Medical Disability Retirement: The Angst of Thought

The distorted and warped world within which we live is often a creation of our own imagination; while it speaks well for man’s creativity and unique conceptualization of a virtual universe, it may not be the most effective formula for physical survival.  On the other hand, perhaps it is our very ability to escape the reality of the barrenness of this world, which allows for such survival.

In preparing, formulating and filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, it is often that “next step” — from fear, loathing, and conceptualization of the foreboding future and what it may portend — which gives one pause in taking the leap from thought-to-action.  But it is action which enlivens the spirit, which uplifts one from the doldrums of cataclysmic cognitive proportions.

Taking concrete steps, as opposed to merely anguishing over the need to get from point A to destination B, is precisely what distinguishes one from being in a state of continual suspension in life, as opposed to progressing towards a goal.  The world of our own making — the linguistic, conceptualizing world of the virtual universe of man’s own creation — must always be balanced by the reality of the physical universe.

Making a decision is important; acting upon a decision is the next important step.

Beginning the process of contacting the doctors, obtaining the forms, or engaging an OPM Disability attorney — those are the actual steps in preparing a Federal Disability Retirement application, whether under FERS or CSRS, which will rescue one from the angst of thought, and spring into action the universe of accomplishment for the future.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire