Federal Employee Disability Retirement: Control Over

There are certain things we have control over; others, merely a spattering of influence; and still others, none at all.

It is often a dictum of life that “happiness” is the capacity to recognize those very categories over which we have control, and those where we have absolutely no control over.  Why?  Because frustration erupts or otherwise builds up around our attempt to maintain control over that which we have absolutely no control over.

Babies and toddlers, we have quite a bit of control over; teenagers, merely some exerted influence; but of adult children who wish to go their own way and ignore the experience of past generations — we have absolutely no control over.  We have limited control over the car we drive — but no control over idiot-other-drivers who also occupy the roads.  We have absolutely no control over the paradigmatic metaphor of sitting atop a mountain and watching two trains below heading at a high rate of speed towards one another on the same railroad track — and it is here that one’s frustration can overwhelm us.

Medical conditions, likewise, are something which we have no control over.  Filing for Federal Disability Retirement under FERS through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management because of a medical condition — well, that is something we have some control over, and it is often helpful to hire an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law in order to exert some greater control over a bureaucratic process which may at first light appear arbitrary, capricious and without any logical sense.

Now, that is the very definition of frustration — of a process which you have no control over, and that is the reason why you should contact a lawyer who specializes in the process of Federal Disability Retirement.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

OPM Disability Retirement Benefits under FERS: The Silent Sufferer

It is normally to one’s detriment; yet, the converse is the one whom we dislike and find irritating — the constant complainer.  The silent sufferer is the one who goes through life quietly, unassumingly, and often anonymously; and when it is time to retire, little fanfare is given, and life moves on without the presence of that person.

It turns out that the silent sufferer did most of the work and his or her absence becomes exponentially emphasized once gone because people suddenly notice what had been accomplished when the person was present.

For Federal Disability Retirement purposes, of course, the silent sufferer is the more difficult case.  For, often, not much is found in the office/treatment records of doctor’s visits, because such a person doesn’t like to complain.  It is only when the medical condition becomes an acute emergency, or when a critical juncture is arrived upon which precludes the ability or capacity to go on as normal.

Everyone is surprised, of course — because Mr. X or Ms. Y never said anything about the medical condition.  It is as if we are talking about some “other” person other than the one needing to file for FERS Disability Retirement benefits.

For such people — and there are many of them — it is necessary to contact an attorney who specializes in OPM Disability Retirement benefits, and to begin to establish the pathway to a nexus connecting the medical condition to the essential elements of his or her job.

For, in the end, the silent sufferer still suffers in silence; it is merely a matter of turning the silence into a tentative shout for help in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, under FERS.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

OPM Disability Retirement Law: Pronounced Uncertainty

These are uncertain times.  Global upheaval has always been the norm; “peace”, if merely the absence of war, has been a rare moment in these decades of forever wars.  Stability is what most people seek — of an opportunity to have the economic and political calm in order to pursue dreams, goals and career choices.

But when uncertainty becomes so pronounced that future plans become threatened, a level of anxiety begins to prevail, leading to delays and dismay of hopeless despairMedical conditions, as well, have the same influence on a personal level.  For, medical conditions — whether chronic or acute — lead to a pronounced sense of uncertainty and hesitation.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition no longer allows you to perform all of the essential elements of your Federal or Postal job, contact an OPM Federal Disability Retirement Lawyer and consider the option of filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application in order to stabilize the future plans which have become of pronounced uncertainty.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

OPM Medical Disability Retirement under FERS: Messing Things Up

Can you mess things up without knowing it?  Absolutely.  Can you mess things up while knowing it?  Again, absolutely.

We have all been in that situation, haven’t we?  The latter context is always troubling — for, as we are engaged in the activity, we begin to have a sense that things are taking the proverbial “wrong turn”, and there is a growing, sinking feeling our involvement and participation in the endeavor plays a significant role in messing things up.

We begin to think up of excuses as to why what we did was less than harmful; we try and minimize our own ineptitude; we try and justify how it would have turned out that badly, anyway.  Or, as in the former context, our own ignorance allowed for the messing up of things and, while the period of ignorance delayed our knowledge (or lack thereof) concerning out active participation in messing things up, when we come to a point of knowledge, we suddenly realize that what we were doing (or not doing) played a major role in messing things up.

Filing a Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS can end up this way: Messing things up by not knowing what to do, what laws to comply with, what criteria needs to be met; or, messing things up by submitting too much information, etc.

To prevent this, contact an OPM Disability Retirement Lawyer who specializes in FERS Disability Retirement Law, and consider the consequences of messing things up.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal & Postal Disability Retirement: Failing to Act

Ours is a society of inertia.  We talk a lot; move around much papers and information; sit and post on various social media outlets; watch movies and shows; and within that flurry of seeming activity, we satisfy ourselves that we are doing things which matter.  But when it comes time to act, when action actually actuates — we so often fail miserably.

It is as Heidegger once quipped — that we have our distracting projects in life in order to avoid thinking about substantive issues and the inevitable.  There is a time to act — of initiating a course of action; of taking preparatory steps; of formulating a plan for the future.

For Federal employees and U.S.Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition no longer allows you to continue in your Federal or Postal career, the time to act is now.

Consult with a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of reversing the usual inaction of inertia, and refute the customary approach of failing to act.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Disability Retirement: From Words to Actions

It is the step which faces the chasm; the human will is a peculiar and mysterious entity; from thought comes actions, but it is that step which is the deep mystery that often cannot be overcome.

We all know “talkers” — those who, though mired in the plenitude of words spoken, never get beyond that.  Are they sincere?  Perhaps.  Some people do speak with the good intentions of following through with actions, but after a repetition of patterns shown where no follow-through is established, people tend to treat such people with dismissive irrelevance or, worse, with open scorn.

Words are meant to lead to actions; when they fail to, we tend to ascribe underlying motives which can never to fully established: “He lied”; “He just didn’t have the time”; “She meant to, but just forgot”; “Oh, you know how she is”, etc.  How actions follow through; what the thought processes are; how the inner sanctum of fear and loathing come into play; these are all the wheels of mystery that turn upon the human mind.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the words, “I have a medical condition”, may then necessitate the actions of, “I must file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits”.

The words are always there; the actions that next need to follow should likely involve picking up the telephone and consulting with an attorney who specializes in FERS Disability Retirement Law.  Then, let the attorney take the next steps; for, upon such a consultation with a legal expert, the words will then flow from “mere words” to actions that actually accomplish the deed.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement Benefits: The Best of Plans

We do what we can with the tools we are given.  We are given a certain time-frame — say, 60 years or so, half a century, several decades, etc., in which to make our “mark” in the world, to gather our resources, accumulate what fortunes we can muster; and within that contest of living a “life”, the make the best of plans.

All plans are, as Mark Twain likely noted, made to be subsequently abandoned; for, the foibles of human folly dictate that the best laid plans must always adapt to the reality of changing circumstances.  However, we make them nonetheless.  Why do human beings have such a need, a desire, a proclivity for making plans?  Do other species engage in such extensive efforts to map out the future, or do they just “live for the moment”?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the best of plans must by medical necessity change and become adapted to the new reality of one’s medical conditions.

Consideration yet must be given for one’s future, and preparing and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application, to be submitted to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, is one of the changes within the framework of another best of plans: To consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of restructuring the best of plans…

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Postal & Federal Employee Medical Retirement: How We Respond

It is the stuff of which life teaches us; the lessons learned, the character growth; of how we respond.  Whether it is in response to the Corona Virus, or to a tragedy more singular and personal, the “process” question is important: How do we respond?  Did we respond with foresight, thoughtfulness, calm and collected?  Or do we flail about frantically in a panic, not knowing what we are doing but doing it nevertheless because, to “do something” is thought to be better than to do nothing at all?

As store shelves become emptied and the predatory few of price-gouging increases, it becomes more and more of a free-for-all in a society where anarchy is on the border’s edge between insanity and rational discourse.  Isolation and self-quarantine seem to be the key to containment, in this case, and social media allows for a semblance of ongoing communication and connectedness; but in the end, how we respond as individuals is important to consider.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition is one beyond a deadly virus, but is instead a chronic condition lasting for over 12 months, this time of isolation may be a moment to consider preparing and formulating a Federal Disability Retirement application, to be ultimately filed with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Contact and consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement and begin the process of the long bureaucratic procedure. That, in the end, is the right way to respond — of how we respond for the long haul.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement: The Segment of Accomplishment

Each of us are allotted a specified time within which to make our fortune, map out our notoriety, earn and gain the respect of our community, and then — recede into the footnotes of history, if even an honorable mention is deservedly given as a coronation of our accomplishments.  The segment of accomplishment is our slice of life; it is the time given in order to make a difference, to “live to the fullest”, to put our stamp upon history; or to remain in the shadows of anonymity.

During the course of that segment of accomplishment, we are often beset with questions that make us pause: Is there meaning in this universe?  Is there a transcendent purpose that guides?  Is our segment of accomplishment of any relevance?  What if we fail at our allotted segment?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who become impacted by a medical condition that prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the questions surrounding one’s segment of accomplishment becomes poignantly posed: Is this the end of my particular segment, and what is there beyond?

Consult with a Federal Disability Attorney who specializes in FERS Disability Retirement law, and begin to consider filing for an effective Federal Disability Retirement application so that the segment of accomplishment for this particular slice can be completed, and a view towards the future — and another segment of accomplishment — may bring about the next stage of fulfillment.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire