Federal and Postal Disability Retirement: Listing Specific Medical Conditions

Because the essence of an OPM Disability Retirement Application under FERS or CSRS goes to the symptomatologies and their impact upon one’s ability or inability to perform one or more of the essential elements of one’s job, it is therefore important to weave throughout the narrative of one’s Statement of Disability the symptoms, the impact, the descriptive events, which impact one’s ability/inability to perform the job.  Thus, while listing specific diagnosed medical conditions shoulder certainly be a part of any such application, the narrative itself should include the description of multiple symptoms resulting from the diagnosis.  Further, while the applicant is disallowed from “adding” any new medical conditions once it has been received by the Office of Personnel Management and assigned a CSA number, nevertheless, the applicant is not a medical doctor, and if a medical condition which later develops or becomes clarified during the process of review needs to be supplemented with an additional medical report or results of a diagnostic test, if the medical condition can be reasonably related to a described symptomatology or description in the original statement of disability, then in all likelihood, it will be allowed in for review.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

CSRS & FERS Disability Retirement: Diagnosis v. Symptoms

Is an official diagnosis important?  It certainly makes for a “clean” Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS & CSRS, and indeed, sometimes the Office of Personnel Management will question the validity of a Federal Disability Retirement application if a treating doctor equivocates on ascribing a clean, clear-cut diagnosis.

But, as they say in philosophy, and specifically in symbolic logic, while a medical diagnosis may be necessary, it is not sufficient.  That is, while a medical diagnosis is often necessary in order to easily identify the medical condition, it is not sufficient to get a Federal or Postal worker an approved Federal Disability Retirement claim.

This is because, beyond an official diagnosis of a medical condition, it is important to describe the manifestation of symptoms, and how those symptoms impact one’s ability to perform the essential elements of one’s job.  To that extent, it is analogous to the story of a primitive tribesman who feared having his picture taken, because to have one’s image captured was to circumscribe the essence of an individual.

Similarly, while a medical diagnosis identifies the “what” of a condition, it fails to show the endless “hows” of that condition — as in, how does it impact one’s job, one’s personal life, one’s sense of well-being, self-image, etc.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Federal and Postal Disability Retirement: Filing

If you believe that preparing, filing, and winning a Federal Disability Retirement case under FERS or CSRS is merely a matter of filling out forms, then don’t hire an attorney. Do it yourself.

On the other hand, if you believe that preparing a Federal Disability Retirement application involves:  gathering, reviewing, and compiling the proper and compelling medical evidence; of drafting and clearlly delineating & describing one’s medical conditions and their impact upon one’s job; of citing the proper legal authorities to provide the legal backing and forceful persuasion necessary; of being counseled in negotiating removal actions; of rebutting spurious arguments made by the Office of Personnel Management; of preparing the groundwork for subsequent appeals; of ultimately winning a case, as opposed to trying to squeak by with a hope and a prayer, then you might consider hiring an attorney.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire