Federal Medical Retirement Law: The Dogmatist

It is easy to fall into being one; and, one need not be overtly (or overly) religious in order to be considered as such.  Ultimately, it is not the opinion held or the inability to see different perspectives or “angles” on a matter; rather, it is the attitude which defines the dogmatist — the arrogance; the refusal to consider other viewpoints; the intransigence of thought.

Now, that is not to say that being “dogmatic” is always a negative thing; for, there are instances in life where “sticking to one’s principles” is a good and necessary thing.  Sometimes, when the winds of change and the malleability of ethical or moral convictions seem to reactively alter as quickly as the weather, it is of some comfort to find a dogmatist in our midst.  But context and content combined, always matter; and it is the “when” as much as the “what” which determines whether being a dogmatist is justified.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal duties, being a dogmatist may be a detriment.  Never think that your own case is a “slam dunk”; for, to be unequivocally adamant about the strength of your disability case is often because the one who suffers from a disabling medical condition cannot think otherwise — in other words, like a dogmatist would think.

Consider, instead, contacting a Federal Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law in order to get a more balanced view of your case, and leave your dogmatic views on more pressing moral or ethical issues which may necessitate the strength of your convictions in order to retain the antiquity of intransigent thoughts.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Disability Attorney Help: The Bifurcated Worker

It is a commonplace event — of bifurcated lives.  Was it always that way?  When there were actually towns and communities where people really knew one another; of that paradise-like vision, where transiency was unknown and stability based the norm?

We have our “work life”, bifurcated from our “personal life”.  We can sit in sub-divided offices, partitioned and designed by a “civil space engineer” who has allocated a specific area of work space which is “yours” as opposed to the “other” person.  We can now telework and not even have to be partitioned in bodily space and time.

However the arrangements are made, work can go on for years and years without ever knowing the personal life of the person with whom we work.  Tom comes in each day and we only know of his “professional” side.  Susan enters the office and we know nothing about the previous 16 or so hours of her disappearance.  For, we have accepted the state of the bifurcated worker, and some would say that such a state of knowledge is a “good” thing — for, in the end, we want to preserve the sanctity of privacy itself.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the issue of who has access and who is allowed to have access, to sensitive medical information, is always of concern.

In order to file for Federal Employee Disability Retirement benefits through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, however, some amount of access must be given; for, to file for OPM Disability Retirement is to cross over and violate the wall of the bifurcated worker.

In order to maneuver successful through the complex maze of such issues involving sensitive medical information, contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin to prepare, formulate and file an effective Federal Employee Disability Retirement application under FERS, with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, where the bifurcated worker must further bifurcate the personal from the professional.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement: In How We See Ourselves

When does the development of the “Self” begin?  How does a personality form?  Where does uniqueness begin, eccentricity spark and individualism falter?  Is there a specific timeline in terms of months or years?

Anyone who has been a parent or grandparent recognizes the point at which a child begins to become conscious of the “self” — a gradual development from “baby” to “toddler”, where greater awareness of the objective world, the various parts of one’s body, the reflection in the mirror, the status of one’s existence and the place one holds within the greater universe, etc.

Later in life, there comes a critical point in how we see ourselves — of having self confidence; of whether we possess a “positive image” of our place within the world; the daily moods we embrace; the self-image we carry about with us throughout society, etc.  For many, it is a struggle — and when a medical condition impacts us, that “self-image” of how we see ourselves can be brutally challenging.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, how we see ourselves may compel you to begin preparing for Federal Disability Retirement.  For, aside from how we see ourselves, the priority of first taking care of one’s health and not allowing for your career to completely destroy your health, should be the priority of first concern.

Contact a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and move beyond what your Federal Agency or Postal Service has done or not done to impact how you see yourself, and instead, take care of the number one priority in how we see ourselves, by taking care of yourself.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Disability Attorney Help: The Chime Which Stills

Wind chimes still the heart; door chimes ring to announce a visitor; but in the midst of winter when the winds howl to pronounce the desolation of the season’s end, neither the visitor nor the warmed heart can stay long to listen to nature’s corridor.

Wind chimes abound in neighborhoods throughout, and when the dog is walked, or the back door opens for a moment’s exit, the music evoked in the still air of night meanders and mocks, but rarely of a hint for what it seeks.  Is chance what makes the stillness of night?

One wonders whether this universe cares for its flock of devotees.  Poetry is but the pause which makes everything worthwhile.  Then, suddenly, a medical condition hits us, and we wonder what the purpose of it all means.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who have had that feeling of a wind chime which stills the heart — that, somehow, there is still a purpose, and not everything is encountered by mere luck or chance — you may want to consider preparing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS, and not just leave everything to luck and chance.

Contact a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and don’t let the chime which stills the heart remain as a passing whim that fails to nudge.

Sincerely, Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Employee Disability Retirement: The Prospective Case

Deciding to move forward on a Federal Disability Retirement case is not a decision which should be taken lightly.

The engagement of and interaction with a lawyer who will represent the Federal or Postal employee in a prospective Federal Disability Retirement case must take into consideration multiple factors on both sides: The substance of the case; the strength of the case; the problems of the case (which are often many); the roadblocks which can defeat a case; the laws which will apply; the case-laws which will need to be cited and in what sequence and form; and many other issues which will arise.

Each case at the outset is obviously a prospective case — and it is the prospect of success or failure and the subsets therein of which should dominate the initial consultation between the potential client and the attorney contacted.  The “sense” of a case can be determined early on; the “foundation” of what is needed may be clarified at the outset; the “weaknesses” may be better defined; and the “chances” of success can be objectively viewed.

Most importantly, consultation with a Federal Disability Lawyer who specializes in FERS Disability Retirement can be assessed with a reasoned effort of definitional magnification in the clarification of issues to be determined.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal and Postal Medical Retirement Benefits: Operating by Fear

NFL teams do it; other sports teams operate by it; corporations cross over into territories of ethical lapses because of it; and, all in all, it is probably a genetic trait from prehistoric times which triggers us into what is commonly known as “survival mode”.  Fear triggers a biochemical response in our bodies where the rush of adrenaline infuses and sharpens every instinct in our being, and we react in either a “fight” or “flight” mode.  The quick-reaction force that compels our bodies and minds to act in order to overcome the fear, is probably a healthy response, and necessary for survival.

It is when such a mode of living becomes chronic, and where we operate by such means over an extended period of time, that it becomes obsessional and likely unhealthy.  The survival instinct is there within us in order to repel and overcome the flashing lights of danger; it is not meant to become a way of living.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, if the continuation of your work involves the constant operation of working for fear of losing your job despite the impact of your medical conditions upon the capacity to do so, contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and consider whether or not filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits might not be the best avenue to calm those survival instincts, and get rid of that mode of operating by fear.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Postal & Federal Disability Retirement: Competing Interests

It is a concept which is familiar to all; for, within a society where various individuals interact, where each person represents a self-interest and groups of individuals combine to form aggregate (or “corporate”) interests, the competition that develops and erupts is a natural phenomena.

For the most part, society operates well and rather smoothly; courts allow for competing interests that have reached a point where resolution must be arbitrated by a third-party authority; physical violence where competing interests resulted in an altercation are resolved by a criminal judicial system; and a well-trained police force deals with competing interests where laws have been violated.

Between nations, competing interests are often resolved by diplomatic negotiations — or end up in wars, resulting in devastation and famine for the general population.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the competing interest which should be identified are: The applicant, whose interest is to obtain a Federal Disability Retirement benefit; the Federal Agency or Postal Unit, who may or may not be supportive of the employee/applicant, and thus may represent a “first order” competing interest; and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, whose competing interest is to deny, where possible, the employee’s application for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

There is also a fourth “competing interest” — that of a Federal Disability Lawyer who will effectively represent the Federal or Postal employee.

Such a lawyer, however, “competes” against the Agency and OPM, and advocates for the Federal or Postal employee.  Consult with an OPM Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and consider whether or not you need proper legal representation in competing against the competing interests you will be facing in a Federal Disability Retirement application.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Disability Retirement: This is Happiness

It is the title of Niall Williams’ recent novel; a story about a young man’s coming of age; and yet, beyond a story about a small town and the movement of progress, electrification and the defining moments of what constitutes “happiness” in the small sense of the word, human trials and miseries, as every story must include both happiness as well as sadness, and no story can be believed without the inclusion of either.

It is, ultimately, not in the accumulation of wealth or fame (for, in the small town where the story is set, neither can even be conceived as to the extreme nature that modernity has embraced), but in friendship and human interaction, of love and admiration.  It is set in a time before electricity was known; when innocent love was from afar; and where death was accepted as part of a natural process.

The undersigned rarely recommends a novel to others, but Niall Williams’ work, “This is Happiness”, is well worth a slow and enjoyable read.  It is like an Irish Ballad written in prose, and you can almost hear the melody within the pages of the novel.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal Job, what “happiness” is comprised of is often — like Niall Williams’ novel — in the smaller things of life: Of acceptance; of being treated with dignity in the workplace; of being able to obtain an annuity because of one’s medical condition when the need arises and the circumstances warrant.

Consult with an OPM Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of early retirement so that you can focus upon the smaller things in life, and declare that yes, This is Happiness.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire
OPM Disability Retirement Attorney

 

Postal & Federal Employees Disability Retirement: The Obituaries

Why are they published, and who reads them?  Is it when a person reaches a certain age and wants a sense of security that death and age are relative issues — that there is not a necessary connection between the two?  Was mortality ever questioned?

When we come across an octogenarian’s obituary, we may merely marvel at such longevity and perhaps with some admiration declare, “At least he lived a long life”; but when we view a young person’s description on the next page, we wonder with sadness at the suddenness of it all.  Was it necessary or inevitable?  How must the parents feel —for that is the horror of every parent, is it not, to bury one’s child before one’s self?

Obituaries provide some level of comfort — of a final testament and declaration to the world that seemingly never cared; on a practical level, to provide whatever social or legal notice to surviving beneficiaries; and as a reminder to us all that life should be celebrated and not mourned — at least for those still living.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from ill health and where health becomes a daily reminder that there are some things in life which are not worth sacrificing, reading the obituaries should jar one into realizing that being a sacrificial lamb at the altar of a Federal Agency or the Postal Service is never a worthwhile goal.  If your health is deteriorating and you have a medical condition which prevents you from performing all of the essential elements of your Federal or Postal job, it may be time to consult with an experienced attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

In the end, you do not want to read your own obituary and shake your head saying, “Too young, too foolish, too late.”

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

FERS Disability Retirement: Refutation of Stefan Zweig’s Essay

FERS OPM Medical Retirement: Refutation of Stefan Zweig’s Essay, “Books are the Gateway to the World”.

Not quite a refutation, but merely a protest — and perhaps a defense of illiteracy.  Zweig writes beautifully; persuasively; in colorful prose that captivates; in convincing form — if not in logical argumentation, but more as a poet who is convinced that words, books, literacy and the spread of the written word is indispensable to life itself.

He ends with this poetic flourish: “The more intimately the man associates with books the more profoundly he experiences the unity of life, for his personality is multiplied; he sees not only with his own eyes but with the countless eyes of the soul, and by their sublime help he travels with loving sympathy through the whole world.”

Who can argue with that?  Who can so poetically refute and rebut a sentence of such insightful beauty?  Yet, it is not with the argument for books and literacy that is objectionable, but rather, the notion that the man with whom he met and befriended but who is later found to be illiterate — that this rampage of sorrow and defense of literacy is at the expense of this unfortunate man.

Consider how he describes such a person: “He is walled in by himself, because he knows nothing of books; his life is dull, troglodytic (Definition: a “member of any of various peoples (as in antiquity) who lived or were reputed to live chiefly in caves” — i.e., “cavemen” or “cavewomen”).  And: “I was shocked to think how narrow the world must seem to the man who has no books.”

True, Zweig may have felt pity for his new-found friend, whom he previously described as a person who possessed a “genius for mimicry and caricatured everybody”, and whom he found fascinating and of enjoyable company — until, it turns out, that he discovered his illiteracy.

The essay ends without a conclusion; perhaps he took the time (without writing about it) with the friend and taught him how to read.  More likely, they went their separate ways — the other fellow pitied for the remainder of Zweig’s days, the author convinced that he was an individual to be pitied.  But that is the criticism to be posited, isn’t it?  That we make judgments without judging ourselves, and unjustifiably when we have the power to do something about the ills we encounter.

For Federal and Postal employees who have encountered that very circumstance — of facing judgments by others while nothing is being done — of a Federal Agency or the Postal Service that has determined that you are not worth “saving” because of a medical condition that now prevents you from performing one or more of the essential elements of your Federal or Postal job; it is then time to consider filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Don’t wait around for help from your Agency or the Postal Service; it is likely that you will not receive it.  Instead, consult with a FERS Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law.  For, in the end, the decision to take the next step to “help yourself” will be up to you, and you should not consider the Federal Agency or the Postal Service to help you as your “friend” — leaving aside whether they will even feel a scintilla of pity for you; they won’t.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire