OPM Disability Retirement: Happiness Only in Stories

Perhaps it is an unavoidable truism that such states of unmitigated joy can be found only in stories; of triumph over tragedy; of endings worthy of fairytales; and of innocence still untouched.  Life is a series of crisis, marked by momentary fragments of a respite well-deserved.

It is the story of human history, whether of private lives left untold within the tombs of unmarked graves or of biographies never written, and which became silent upon the demise of the family stories that were uttered only at gatherings and with the rhythmic rocking of chairs where porch lights were left on with the humming of mosquitoes and moths fluttering against the midnight air.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition and who need to file for FERS Disability Retirement benefits, the story which must be told is the response to the questions on OPM SF 3112A, Applicant’s Statement of Disability.  It is not one of happiness, but of turmoil and pain; but it is nevertheless a story which must be told.

Consult with a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of filing for FERS Disability Retirement benefits, lest the happiness only in stories remains so while the pain of life counters the possibility of something more.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement: Etymology versus Entomology

The difference in spelling involves more than a single letter; but in using the words in a sentence, the subtle distinction of a single consonant makes for all the relevance in the world.  One refers to the very history and evolution of words, their meaning and usage; the other is a branch of a larger discipline of arthropodology, the subset of which focuses upon insects and the study thereof.

In speech, therefore, the mistaken insertion of the consonant can create a hilarious situation resulting from the unknowing misuse of the word; whereas, in written form, it would probably be quickly identified as a misspelling and overlooked without appreciating the “funny-ness” of the error.  And, as well, the difference between speech and written form allows for checks, re-checks and changes before the final submission of that which is presented to a viewer.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition, such that the medical condition prevents one from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s positional duties for the Federal agency or the U.S. Postal Service, the ability of preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, whether the Federal or Postal employee is under FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset, is an important component in the administrative process itself.

Often, one hears the grumbles and complaints of those who say, “If only I could just explain it…”  As opposed to?  Yes, the intonation and persuasive voice of speech can be an effective tool, and in contrast to the written form, which can be viewed and analyzed over time, the one-time urgency of the used-car salesman can certainly turn the immediacy of a decision into a statistically relevant sales pitch; but that is why submission of a Federal Disability Retirement application is received as a “paper-presentation”, precisely because it involves medical documentation, laws to be applied, and criteria to be analyzed by OPM in order to make a proper decision concerning all Federal Disability Retirement submissions.

It is the written form which allows for expungement and erasures of subtle mistakes; and when the final Federal Disability Retirement application is compiled, submitted and presented, it is the effort of careful deliberation in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement packet which will make all the difference to the administrative specialist at OPM.

For, while a quick sale may be made by the persuasive voice of the used-car salesman, that is precisely the reason why there are laws concerning changed minds after the ink has dried on the signature line of a contract; and like the distinction to be made between “etymology” and “entomology”, the pen must be the sword of choice in preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, whether the Federal or Postal employee is under FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire