Federal Worker Disability Retirement: Impact of the Economy

In making a decision impacting Federal Disability Retirement under FERS or CSRS from the Office of Personnel Management, multiple factors must be deliberated upon.  Filing for Federal Disability Retirement is a serious step.  

One of the pragmatic advantages involves the factor that, in addition to receiving a Federal Disability Retirement annuity, the Federal or Postal Worker may make earned income up to 80% of what one’s former Federal position currently pays.  This is an important consideration to take into account, given the fact that FERS Disability Retirement pays 60% of the average of one’s highest three consecutive years of service for the first year, then 40% every year thereafter.  

In a seemingly entrenched recession with an anemic recovery, the Federal or Postal worker may pause in considering filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits. However, it is important to recognize the necessity of the present, while keeping an eye to the future in making such a decision.

Normally, it is the medical condition itself which dictates the necessity of filing for Federal Disability Retirement.  This is not an “optional” circumstance, where one may consider filing or not filing.  The only “option” (if there is one) involves whether one can continue to drudge through the pain, anxiety, panic attacks, or other medical episodes, for a few months longer, and therefore delay the initiation of the process.  But this only delays the inevitable.  

Thus, the first order of business must always be to take the time to attend to one’s health and medical condition.  

The economy will always be “what it is”, and will trudge along and recover. When that moment comes, the Federal or Postal employee who has already filed for, and obtained, Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS or CSRS will have the time to carefully select his or her second career path, because of the financial security of Federal Disability Retirement benefits already received.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire