OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: Learning a New Language

Perhaps, with modern technology, there is little need — or incentive — to do so.  There are “apps” for foreign languages, translation of phrases, and electronic dictionaries to convert concepts from one’s native tongue into esoteric languages of foreign origins.  And, like testing one’s knowledge and memory, something has been lost with the rise of technological ease.  No longer is it necessary to try and communicate by trial-and-error combined with over-exaggerated hand gestures, universal sign languages and facial expressions of grave frustrations.

No — we all just turn to our Smart Phones and allow for technology to perform the working of learning a new language.

In some instances, however, not even modern technology can assist in learning a “new language” — such as the language of Federal Disability Retirement Law.  For, in many senses, a Federal or Postal worker attempting to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits must indeed learn a new “language” — of the rules of eligibility; of what constitutes a legally viable accommodation; of foreign terms and legal concepts which must be understood and grasped before moving forward.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who need to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, contact a “translator” who can assist and guide you in learning a new language — a Federal Disability Retirement lawyer.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Employee Disability Retirement: Sound Advice

Sound” is a word which completely changes its meaning when combined with the word “advice”.  Taken separately, independently and in isolation, the word when articulated will not evoke the meaning produced by the combination, but rather, of noises one may hear, a song one is particularly fond of, or the voice of a familiar person, etc.  When placed together with the word, “advice”, it takes on an entirely separate meaning: Of being solid, reliable, truthful, etc.

Of course, one can also argue that it is merely a repetitive tautology, unnecessary and redundant; for, “advice given” should, by definition, be sound to begin with, otherwise it is neither advice nor sound and the duality of the meaning doesn’t add anything one to the other.  But clearly there is such a thing as bad advice, or advice which is “not sound”, and so there is a reason to combine the two words together, for the word “sound” does indeed add something to the word “advice” to combine and make up the concept, “sound advice”.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, what is often lacking in the field of Federal Disability Retirement is not only “sound advice”, but any advice at all.  Agencies don’t want to disseminate information about Federal Disability Retirement; Supervisors and Managers offer ignorance as an excuse; and even your own Human Resource Office is deliberately unhelpful.

Consult with a Federal Disability Retirement Lawyer and obtain some sound advice, lest the soundness be less than sound and the advice becomes one which is regrettable.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Postal & Federal Employees with Disabilities: Getting Started

Your eyes are closed but you are awake; the problem is getting started.  You sit and do all sorts of other work, but not the one which has a hard deadline or is the most important one; the problem is getting started.  There are multiple projects which have been left undone, or have not even seen the fruits of beginning labor; the problem is getting started.  You get the idea; no, you are not alone in the problem of getting started.

If procrastination is the locked door and motivation is the supposed key, the problem still remains when the chasm between vision and action remains untethered.

Medical conditions conspire to vanquish all of the logical arguments we make in our own heads: It’ll get better; maybe the Agency won’t notice that things aren’t getting done; people will understand; coworker’s know I have a medical condition, so I’m sure they’ll be empathetic; and on and on, we allow for the medical condition and the lack of getting started to somehow be left on the roadside as so much human detritus as litters the mind with scattered thoughts.  But we know it cannot go on forever.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, it is too often that point — of “getting started” — which prevents and delays what has already become necessary.

Call a Federal Medical Retirement Lawyer and start the OPM Disability Retirement process of getting started by allowing the Federal Employee Disability Retirement Attorney to get started for you.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: The Typical Day

For some, it is a monotonous conversation which can be engaged in while being on mental autopilot: “How was your day?”  “Good.  Just another typical day.  And yours?”  “The same.”

It is that repetitive pablum of pointless conversations engaged in throughout households the world over — pointless, but necessary, in order to establish the comfort of monotony, which is what we all seek; we just don’t know it.  We think we desire excitement — though not too much of it; or of an atypical day — so long as we can rely upon a typical day following; or perhaps, for some, of a fresh relationship — so long as it does not infringe upon the ones we already have.

The “typical day” is one which is challenging — but not so much that we cannot meet the challenge; a day which may have some surprises — but not ones we could not have predicted; and, perhaps, a day which can be talked about without reverting back to the pablum of autopilot — so long as we can relax and not put too much energy into the conversation of the day.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, there is no such thing as a “typical day”.  Each day is fraught with pain, anguish, unpredictable behavior on the part of supervisors and coworkers; unending harassment from one’s own agency; and the fear of a future yet to be decided.

Consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin to consider whether or not Federal Disability Retirement might return you from the atypical days of today, to those boring, typical days you once knew.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire