FERS & CSRS Disability Retirement for Federal and USPS Workers: The Reluctant Doctor II

Dealing with the Reluctant Doctor — one who presumably has been treating the potential applicant for Federal Disability Retirement benefits for at least several months, but often for several years — is a rather “touchy” subject.  

On the one hand, the build-up of confidence, confidentiality, and security developed over many years of having a doctor-patient relationship is at stake; on the other hand, the Federal or Postal employee has come to a critical point in his or her future, career and professional life, where the support of the treating doctor in the preparation, formulation and filing of a Federal Disability Retirement application has become necessary.  

Doctors, by nature dislike the administrative aspects of preparing lengthy medical narrative reports.  Yet, most doctors recognize the necessity of that aspect of their practice, and are willing to perform the service as part of their duty to their patients.  A diplomatic, sensitive balance must be struck, but one that is honest and placed within the appropriate context of one’s health and future well-being.  

In essence, the doctor must be asked about his or her support in preparing a Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS or CSRS, but in the context of a larger discussion concerning one’s health, treatment modalities, permanency and chronicity of disabling medical conditions, and future treatment.  In essence, the “reluctant doctor” must be persuaded to disrobe his or her reluctance, for the sake of the patient’s health.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

OPM Disability Retirement: The Passionate Doctor

The doctor who is most supportive of an OPM Disability Retirement application under FERS or CSRS is often the one who understands the “fine print” of what it means to be “disabled” under FERS or CSRS.  That is precisely why the Standard Form 3112C (Physician’s Statement) is often a harmful form, rather than a helpful form.

There are other reasons why the form should never be signed or submitted, but it is enough that it not only tends to confuse the physician, but also does not properly explain to the treating physician the criteria and the underlying meaning of what is necessary to qualify for OPM Disability Retirement benefits.

Generally speaking, doctors are not very passionate about turning in their patients over to the gristmill of the disabled, thinking that putting a person out to pasture is not only medically unnecessary, but ultimately detrimental to the psychological and physical well-being of a patient.

But when it is properly explained to the doctor, in easy and understandable terms, what and why the benefit of Federal Disability Retirement under FERS and CSRS exists, and to inform the doctor of the benefit to the patient, then it is quite possible to have not only the technical support of the doctor, but more importantly, to garner the passionate support of the doctor as well.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire