FERS Medical Retirement Law: Of Better Times Before

We like to think that; of filtered memories downstream where the pond is pristine and pure.  But the question remains:  Were they?

Romanticization of “before” is a capacity uniquely human.  Today, we even think of better wars before — of World War II, and even of that “Great War to end all wars” — WWI.  To have endured and survived The Great Depression was to have experienced some grand period of American history;  for, of better times before is of a time where communities were intact, children didn’t have the traumas of modernity, and life didn’t have the complexities of Smartphones, Facebook, Instagram and computerized conundrums.

Of better times before — before what?  Before when?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a health condition, the “before when” is answered quite easily:  Before the onset of the medical condition.  And the “before what” is also discernible:  Of that time before when the medical condition was manageable, and it did not interfere with the ability and capacity to perform all of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal Service job.

Is it true — of better times before?

It depends upon the time period; but certainly, when health was thoughtlessly taken for granted, there were better times before, and in the comparative “now”, the way forward is to consider preparing an effective FERS Disability Retirement application, and have the time to attend to one’s health in order to reach that dreamland of better times before.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal & Postal Employee Disability Retirement: The Non-Existent Door

It is the door which should exist, but doesn’t.

The Non-Existent door includes: The one with the sign on it which says, “Office of Reputation Restoration Once the Truth Comes Out” — you know, the place where your reputation is restored after it turns out that things people said about you weren’t true, after all.  Or, how about: “Office of Refunds — A Dollar for Each Day Your Kids were Ungrateful”.  This is the office where you suddenly become extraordinarily wealthy for all of the effort you put into raising your kids, but where you never received any thanks.  Or, the door with the sign which reads: “Office of Body Parts and Replacements” — where you can trade in a bad back or a bum knee for a brand new one.

Well, such an office door does “somewhat” exist, in that a doctor can do their best to try and repair certain medical conditions.  Unfortunately, the science of medicine has not yet been perfected, and until it has, we have to continue to live lives which must take into account various medical conditions which are not ultimately curable, and have become chronic and restrictive.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management is often the only available response to the Non-Existent Door — the one which says, “Office Where You can Keep your Job despite your Medical Conditions”.

Contact a retirement attorney who specializes in Federal Employee Disability Retirement Law, and enter the door not of Non-Existence, but of an existence entitled, “Federal Disability Retirement annuitant”.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

FERS Disability Retirement Benefits: Parting the Waters

It is a Biblical reference which was part of a common culture, at one time.  Perhaps the reference is no longer understood by many, or even by most.  It is in the Book of Exodus, Chapter 14 — and whether taken literally or metaphorically, it is meant to convey the story of a journey which meets an obstacle — as all journeys of life must by necessity engage in some form of conflict.

That is the crucial and inevitable symbole of life: Of how we meet the challenge of obstacles which are sure to arise.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the obstacles are essentially twofold: The medical condition itself (which the Federal or Postal employee will likely have to contend with for the rest of his or her life), and getting an approval of a Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

The treating doctors are hopefully capable of attending to the first obstacle.  For the second obstacle, contact a Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of healing and overcoming the obstacles tantamount to Moses’ parting the waters.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: Covid-19 Impact

The residual impact of this global pandemic is yet to be seen.  More facts; more scientific evidence; more tracing studies will have to be engaged.

Yet, for many Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers, the direct impact of the Corona Virus has already been felt.  Whether having contracted the virus and been hospitalized; whether deemed a “high risk” individual because of other underlying medical conditions or because of a suppressed and compromised immune system; these and other factors may result in a Federal or Postal employee being prevented from continuing in his or her career.

In that event, filing a Federal Disability Retirement application through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management may be the appropriate course of action.

Consult with an attorney to discuss whether or not Federal Disability Retirement is the right next step during this Pandemic that has wreaked havoc over so many lives, and which will continue to do so for years and years to come.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

OPM Disability Retirement: Unique Circumstances

They arise when the isolation becomes all the more magnified; and they close upon you and make you believe that you are alone in the world.  Each circumstance, by definition, is a unique one: Unique because all previous such circumstances never involved you; unique because the time and place never encompassed you; unique because it has happened to you, as opposed to someone else.

When a medical condition is involved, you somehow know that others have also suffered from similarly illnesses, disabilities or diseases (unless it is the Corona Virus — which, again, is not so much “unique” as it is a different strain from other viruses which has infected the greater universe), and yet the isolation it imposes, the sense of “separateness” it necessitates, makes it profoundly unique.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, just remember that —yes, your condition is unique; but that no, the process of filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS is not unique to your particular circumstances; rather, it needs the guidance and advice of a Federal Disability Lawyer who is experienced in taking your unique circumstances and applying it to the complex administrative process of obtain a Federal Disability Retirement.

Consult with an attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin to conform your unique circumstances to the particularity of Federal Disability Retirement Law that governs the unique circumstances and turns it into an ordinary annuity to protect your important future.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Federal Employee Disability Retirement: Suffering

It is something that cannot be avoided; it is part of life, of living, of engaging.  The history of it existence is palpable; the tactile images throughout can be experienced in images painted and words described; and the various religions embrace it – some as a foundation that allows for forgiveness to alleviate that felt by others; many, as a foundation to explain it away; and still others, to train a disciplined life in order to avoid it, or at least to contain it.

Whether by meditation or medication; through enduring or embracing; or perhaps even by enjoying some form of it in a masochistic manner; it is there because the body, mind and soul are sensitized in the evolutionary process of advancement to remain heightened for survival’s sake.

Suffering is part of living; without it, we imagine that life would be a constant cauldron of endless merriment, when in fact its absence would spell the very definition of misery and decay.

Throughout history, sickness, death and suffering encapsulated an apt description of life, whether human or otherwise.  Thus did Thomas Hobbes admonish the world in his seminal work, Leviathan, where the famous passage describes the natural state all human beings find themselves in until the rescue by political community or social contract, that the life of man is “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.”

But whether by social contract elevating the aggregation of humans into defensive communities envisioning civilization and cultivation beyond the penury of life’s misgivings, or some utopian belief that can result in avoidance of that which is inherent to us all, the fact is that suffering can at best be contained and limited, but never extinguished or eradicated.  Life famine, viruses, cats, weeds, moles, droughts and diseases – we can inoculate against and quarantine as best we can, but they keep coming back and rearing their heads up even after exhausting their nine lives and filling in the holes they have dug.

Suffering is, in the end, that which is there for a purpose – of allowing for feelings; of contrasting the opposite of ecstasy and joy, without which there would be no comprehension nor appreciation, as “being” cannot be understood without its flip-side, “nothingness”.  Thus, the question must always come down to:  Not “whether” it must be, but to what “extent” it needs be.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition, such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal positional duties, it may well be that you have reached a pinnacle point of suffering such that preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application, submitted to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, becomes a necessity.

Every Federal or Postal employee, whether under FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset, must make the “right” decision for him or her self, as to the timing, the substantive event and the future securitization for livelihood’s sake.  It is, in the end, suffering itself and the medical condition that overwhelms, that often determines such a course of action, and that is a very personal decision that each individual must decide in the most appropriate of circumstances.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

 

Medical Retirement for Federal Employees: The touch of life

People often refer to “the touch”; of Midas’ ability to engage in alchemy, now transformed into a metaphor for those whose every endeavor results in financial gain; or of that “soft touch” in the arena of basketball, where the swish of the net and the easy bounce which finds the diameter of the hoop always larger than the irascible target of our trying attempts.  But it is the “touch of life” which encompasses all of that, and more.

When most struggle with the morning fog of first dawn, and youth craves for the security of childhood but act with cynicism to protect their own pride; and pride itself, foolish in its heart, but where wisdom never finds refuge but for the mistakes made in trying.  The touch of life comes to the fore when wandering souls finally find restive quietude from the troubles of the world, and for a brief moment when time, history, and the troubles which beset, can be set aside in an orderly, systematic and rational universe of timeless peace and finality of purpose.

Wisdom is hard to come by; and in the midst of daily struggles, finding clarity of purpose is impossible, especially when troubles abound upon the horizon of life’s plenitude.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are struggling because the Federal agency or the U.S. Postal Service harasses, intimidates and engages in unfair labor practices, preparing an application for Federal Disability Retirement benefits through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management is often the only viable choice left.

Life often grants only limited options, but when we grumble and complain about the lack of alternatives, we merely delay and obfuscate the richness open to our own lives.  Instead, what the Federal or Postal employee needs to do, is to take that opportunity and prepare, formulate and file an effective Federal Disability Retirement application with OPM.

Grumbling about fate not in the cards merely takes energy away from that which will work; and as America is a land of pragmatism, the home to William James and the only original philosopher from this country, it does well to recognize that the touch of life is not reserved to the magic of alchemy, but to the choices we wisely accept and forge forward upon.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire