FERS Disability Retirement Claims: The Question First Appeared

In the theory of evolution of Man, when did it first supposedly occur?  Certainly, other species engage in query — for, isn’t suspicion and cautionary approach a form of a question?

When a trap is set and a squirrel approaches the contraption cautiously, isn’t the suspicious caution a form of a question?  What is it?  Is it safe?  Why does it have food inside of it?  Or the mouse which manages to eat the cheese without triggering the killer-mechanism — is it just by chance that it steps lightly around the trap?

Are such actions precursors of non-verbal queries before the actualization of a question mark?  And in modernity, when we walk about our lives but fail to ask the questions needed — is it significant when the question first appears, or has the question been around unasked but manifested by the actions we have been taking?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the question first appeared in a non-verbal form when you began to have difficulties performing one or more of the essential elements of your job, post-appearance or indication of a medical condition.

The question first appeared long ago; and, now, the question mark itself is beginning to multiply, albeit in a more pronounced, verbalized form: Will I be able to continue like this?  Have others noticed my deficiencies?  How much longer before my performance is no longer acceptable?

All such questions are relevant, but the most pressing one out of the many of the questions first appearing should be: Should I contact an OPM Disability Lawyer about Federal Disability Retirement?  For, that question has likely been around for some time, but the question first appeared when you realized that your medical condition was and remains incommensurable with the positional duties of your Federal or Postal position.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement under FERS: When Fluff Rules

When fluff rules, one wonders at the credibility of the entire endeavor.  When fluff rules, it is the lack which becomes magnified and poignant.  When fluff rules, suspicions abound.

One wonders whether present-day applications of therapy and psychoanalysis have become dominated by those who simply could not comprehend the rigors of Jung or Freud, and that the tertiary influences of second-rate thinkers are what is currently guiding the incompetencies masked as expertise and profundity.  But fluff can only survive for too long before it is revealed as lacking in substance.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from medical conditions such that the medical conditions prevent the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS must include a substantive legal argument which lays out the meat of the matter.

Fluff will not work; fluff will not rule.  Law is a serious business, and the argumentation of “the law” must be what rules in order to meet the criteria in a Federal Disability Retirement case.

Contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin the process of preparing, formulating and filing an effective and substantive Federal Disability Retirement application with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management under FERS, where fluff rarely passes by and where the hard legal facts of the case must be king.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Retirement Law: In Anticipation Of…

Why do we chop and stack wood months before winter’s first blade of frost?  Why are drunk drivers arrested before they have committed any crime?  Why do we purchase life or health insurance before the contingent event has occurred, potentially throwing away hundreds of thousands of dollars on a bet which we will likely never win?

Are such actions engaged out of fear, or out of anticipatory logic based upon a rational thought process of, “What if?”  Do species aside from our own engage in anticipatory actions?

The dog who anticipates his master’s return home at the same time each day; the birds who come each season to the gardener who fills the feeder in the springtime of bursting growth; the geese who fly south; the butterflies that travel the seasonal changes — are they any less “logical” than our supposed “higher-level” reasonings?

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are beginning to prepare an effective OPM Disability Retirement application in anticipation of what will ultimately result from an ongoing, deteriorating medical condition, the arguments proffered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management are often along the lines of: But you aren’t there, yet.  Your agency says that you have been doing a great job — look at your past performance ratings!  Yes, but….

Contact an OPM Disability Retirement Lawyer to discuss how to rebut those argument which OPM makes in anticipation of…

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill,
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Postal and Federal Employee Disability Benefits: Trying Out New Things

Or approaches.  Or new ideas.  Is there ever anything wrong with that?

This is America — or so we like to say — the land of pioneers and the breed of explorers and entrepreneurs who reflect the “New World” approach to everything: stamp out the old, bring in the new.  But at what cost?

That is, of course, the essence of the debate:  Of whether there is justification, moral or otherwise, to allow for the “new” to replace the “old”.  And, what if the “new” is merely a short-term fancy which has never been tried and tested?

We are doing much of that these days — of subjecting everyone to Smartphones and Internet-based learning, without any data regarding the long-term effects of such approaches; of non-judgmental therapeutic methods which fail to hold people accountable for their actions; and, somehow, we have bought into the idea that “new” is a synonym for “good”.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, trying out the “new thing” called Federal Disability Retirement is not really anything new; rather, it may be a newly-acquired consideration prompted by your medical condition and the need for change, but the reality is that there is a long and tested body of law which will determine whether or not you are eligible for Federal Disability Retirement benefits.

It is “old” in the sense that it has been around for a long time, but “new” to you because you may not have needed to consider it until lately.

Contact an OPM Lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of trying out this “new” thing, which is actually an “old” thing, but in trying it out, has become entirely new to you.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement: Painting The Picture

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who are considering filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, under FERS, the image which must be considered is the following:  There is a wall.  That “wall” represents the U.S. Office of Personnel Management — the Federal Agency which makes a determination on all Federal Disability Retirement applications.

On the left side of the wall is an unidentified entity called, “Difficult”.  On the right side of the wall is another unidentified entity entitled, “Can’t”.  If you are on the left side of the wall, have you climbed over onto the right side of the wall?

Thus, for those Federal or Postal employees who are still working at their jobs, but who say things like, “I’m having a hard time doing my job”, or, “It is becoming more and more difficult going to work”, etc. — contact an OPM Disability Retirement Attorney, that is, a lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and discuss the steps which must be taken in order to climb the wall of OPM from the left side, to the right.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Retirement: Parting With Our Former Selves

Perhaps that is the issue which often prevents a Federal or Postal employee from filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS, through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management — of parting with, or from, one’s former self.

For, clearly, a proverbial “fork in the road” occurred — of a recognition that one’s medical condition has impacted the ability, capacity and potentiality for continuing to work in one’s Federal or Postal career; but the image of one’s former self (before the impact of one’s medical condition) still continues to prevail, to dominate, to remain in prominent presence — to haunt.

What one was; the self-reflective confluence of that competent, self-assured individual who once was able to do almost anything.  Our former selves must face the reality of who we are today; and today is not a permanent fixture of what may bring about tomorrow.

Contact an OPM Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement benefits from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, and begin the process of letting go of, and parting from, out former selves.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal and Postal Employee Disability Retirement Law: At Its Worst

We can all be at our best — so long as we are never tested.  We can talk, and talk some more, about what we “would have done” had we been in such-and-such situation.  And since we relegate our military to men and women who are the economically-disadvantaged — instead of a draft which would impact all sectors of society — we can talk endlessly about what we “would have done” if we were in this situation or that.

We can say we will never do X — until we are actually confronted with the circumstances which constitute X; and a person can give a vow, have children based upon that vow, and years later renounce the vow without blinking an eye.  “Well, we drifted apart”; “The circumstances changed”; “He/she didn’t want to be married anymore” — and on and on.  But what about the vow?  Silence.

The test of virtue is not mere words; rather, it is the actions which result from actual circumstances encountered.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, you may have seen your Agency or the Postal Service at its best — because nothing has tested its response to what you are going through.

Unfortunately, experience has taught that Federal Agencies and the Postal Service reveal their true character when confronted with an issue at its worst — such as treating an individual who needs to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Don’t be foolish and assume your Agency or the Postal Facility will respond and treat you the same as when things were going smoothly and everyone was at their best, for such is not the test of character; it is when things are at its worst when the true test is applied.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) Disability Law: The Novelty Vanished

As it should be, for a child, everything is viewed in terms of, “Wow!”  The novelty of life, of the experiences brought about by a world freshly encountered — like winter’s first snow or the dawn of spring’s warmth, it is the combined meeting of a world newly seen by the eyes of youth yet untarnished and without the destructive force of cynicism which accounts for curiosity, eagerness, innocence, unvanquished optimism and hopeful initiation of plans for a bright future.

That novelty vanished — and vanquished, extinguished and beaten down — comes from repeated encounters with a world which shows no care or concern.  It is when life’s complications keep knocking us down; that is when the novelty vanished.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, the novelty vanished comes about from a combination of events: The critical juncture where the medical conditions become chronic and restrictive; the Agency’s or the Postal Service’s unsupportive attitude; the steady exhaustion of one’s sick leave; the potential of being put on a Performance Improvement Plan; the likelihood of being terminated; the administrative sanction of being placed on AWOL status; the refusal to allow for LWOP; and it is the combination of any or all of these factors which results in the Federal employee shaking his or her head and saying, “Wow” — but not with a sense of wonderment, but because the novelty has vanished.

It is time to file, then, for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS.

Contact a Federal Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and try and win back that time when the first snow of winter stunned you, the first breeze of spring refreshed, and the world could again be described with a singular encapsulation of a word exclaimed: Wow!

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Employee Disability Retirement: Secondary Causation

Can a Federal or Postal employee obtain an approval from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, of a Federal OPM Disability Retirement benefit under FERS, for secondary-causation conditions?

Cancer is a prime example — for, it is most often NOT the cancer itself which debilitates a person, but rather, the secondary causation: The residual effects and after-effects of Chemotherapy and/or Radiation therapy, resulting in numbness, neuropathic pain, cognitive dysfunctions, memory loss, inability to focus or concentrate — the compendium of secondarily caused impact originating from the necessary treatment of the primary cause.

Thus, the mistake that many Federal and Postal employees make in presenting a Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, is in the characterization of one’s medical condition.  Secondary Causation cases can be tricky, and how it is presented makes all of the difference.

Contact a FERS Attorney who specializes in Federal and Postal Disability Retirement Law and see whether or not you qualify based upon a secondary causation condition.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.