FERS Medical Disability Retirement: Health at What Price

Everything has a price to pay — whether in terms of monetary value, or by some other quantification, by terms of labor, effort expended, a return of some negligible cost, etc.  In a capitalistic society, we tend to think always in terms of bartered values — is doing X “worthwhile”?  Does buying Y give me the best value for the money expended?

Then, there are times when no amount of money can “make up” for the experience or phenomena, as in precious moments with your kids, the expensive but “once-in-a-lifetime” trip to Rome; or even to a restaurant to celebrate an event.

In this country, where money determines status, accessibility and opportunity to an exponential degree, the language of price, value and bartering of commodities is diffusely peppered throughout our cognitive dictionaries.  Does everything have a price?  Can anything be bought, bartered and traded for?  Can you put a pice on your health?

For Federal employees and Postal Workers who suffer from a illness or disability such that this particular illness or disability prevents the Federal or Postal employee from performing one or more of the basic elements of one’s Federal job, the issue of health — the deterioration, the chronic and progressive symptoms involved — is often tied closely to whether continuing to work at the Federal or Postal job further exacerbates the decline of your health.

When that point comes — of that critical juncture where continuation in the job adds to the decline of your health — then it is time to ask the question, My health at what price?

And when you arrive at that critical juncture, then it is time to consider preparing, formulating and filing an effective Federal Disability Retirement application under FERS.

Contact an OPM Disability Lawyer who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and consider that important question, Health at What Price?

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

FERS Disability Retirement Help: Problem Solving

How does one learn how to do it?  Does it begin in childhood, by “working” with toys, in being allowed the patience of time in “working things out”; of being taught that frustration comes when impatience intercedes and confuses the two conceptual entities:  of process and goal?  How much does a “helicopter” parent impede a child’s capacity to learn it?

You know — those parents who are constantly on their cellphones, hovering nearby; then, the parent suddenly looks up and sees the neglected child tottering on a dangerous ledge 2 feet high and rushes over to swoop the child to safety lest the poor child falls upon a soft bed of mulch below.

Of connecting train-tracks on the living room floor; figuring out that unless the tracks are properly connected, derailment will occur; Of putting the right letter into the matching slot; or, instead of the child being allowed sufficient time to “figure it out”, the parent — impatient and without the time because the next chore or appointment is upcoming — finishes the task for the child.

For the child, the “work” of life is comprised of being given sufficient time to solve the problems of play; if that is not learned and allowed for, the task of problem solving may well become a problem in and of itself.

For U.S. Government employees and Postal Service workers who suffer from a medical problem, such that the medical problem prevents the Federal or Postal Service employee from performing one or more of the basic elements of one’s Federal or Postal Service job, the problem of getting an approval from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is the “Obstacle” problem:  There is a wall, and that wall is the obstacle, and the obstacle is comprised of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management — the Federal human resources agency which makes all determinations on Federal Disability Retirement applications.

How does one climb over the metaphorical wall?  Contact a FERS Disability Retirement Attorney who specializes in OPM Disability Retirement Law and leave the specialized problem-solving issue of obtaining an approval for a Federal or Postal Disability Retirement application to the FERS specialist who is uniquely trained in such problem-solving issues.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill
Lawyer exclusively representing Federal and Postal employees to secure their Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

 

OPM Disability Retirement Benefits: The Players

Whether in a play, on a sports team or surrounding a poker table, they comprise the gamut of those involved, whether of centrality, marginal, peripheral, “somewhat”, etc.

In life generally, we have a “role” to play.  Some begin to find such terms to imply inauthenticity; but in any household, in any company, in any game, there are central characters, role players, bit-players and even “the boss”.  Or, in a family — of a father, a husband, the primary earner, etc.

It is always good to know “the players” in any circumstance, because they are the ones who must be dealt with, understood, tolerated, placed in the properly assigned status, etc.  Characters in plays, books, short stories, etc., likewise encompass the universe of the players involved.

In a Federal Disability Retirement case, there are also “the players” — the doctors (who will support a case); the agency’s Human Resources personnel; the Initial decider at OPM; the potential decider at the Reconsideration level; the Administrative Judge at the MSPB — all are players, whether currently inactive or potentially involved.  And your lawyer — a specialist in Federal Disability Retirement Law — should be one of the central players.

Contact a disability attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law, and begin to round up the cast of characters who will play an integral role in your quest for OPM Disability Retirement Law — the “players” who will be playing in the field of Federal Disability Retirement.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Lawyer

 

Postal & Federal Employee Disability Retirement from the OPM: Fighting for Your Rights

Everything of value is worth fighting for.  Further, just because you win a battle, it does not mean that the “war” has been victorious.  Of course, the language of “war”, “battle”, “fight”, etc., is often overused and can be misinterpreted, and perhaps over-hyped: games are games; a football game is not truly a war; an administrative process of “fighting” for disability retirement benefits is not strictly a “battle”, but merely a legal process of obtaining a benefit.

When we utilize and apply words in context-specific circumstances, we tend to misinterpret the true nature of the process.

In Federal Disability Retirement Law, however, the metaphors used are, indeed, appropriate — “fighting” for your rights is the applicable wording, and being prepared to “battle” with OPM is also appropriate.  Federal Disability Retirement benefits are worth fighting for; it is of great value; and, once won, you must continue to maintain vigilance in retaining your benefits.

Contact a Federal Disability Lawyer who specializes in OPM Disability Retirement Law and make sure that you understand the value of what the “battle” is you are fighting for.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire
OPM Disability Retirement Lawyer

 

Federal Employees with Chronic Medical Conditions: What to Do

It is the universal question which confronts us all: The next steps; how to react; what sequence of actions to take; and, in the end, it also involves any verbal or written responses, as well.  For, the “doing” part can involve both actions and words.

From the little boy confronting a bully who asks the question, “What are you going to do about it?” — to the adult who is faced with a crisis which may involve other family members, where the question is somewhat altered: “What are we going to do about it?” — the answer is not always clear; the response, not always known.

For Federal employees and U.S. Postal workers who suffer from a medical condition such that the medical condition prevents the Federal or Postal worker from performing one or more of the essential elements of one’s Federal or Postal job, “What to do” is the question posed, the problem confronted.

We are never expected to know everything, although all of us would like to think that we have an answer to most of life’s problems.  But this is a unique circumstance, a special order, a confrontation of unknown proportions.  And when you are faced with the unknown, it is best to contact someone who is experienced in the “What” and the “Doing” in response to the “what”.

Contact a Federal Disability Attorney who specializes in Federal Disability Retirement Law and begin the process of confronting the “what” — as in, What to Do?

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire